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Cut
Cutting
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Cut; Cut Off
Cut; Cut Off [Heb. kāraṯ, kāḥaḏ, gāḏa‘, nāṭah, qāṣaṣ, also gāzaz, mûl (Ps. 118:10–12), nāṯaḥ (Ex. 29:17; Lev. 1:6, 12; 8:20), gāḏaḏ (Dt. 14:1; 1 K. 18:28; Jer. 16:6), dāmam (2 S. 2:9; Jer. 48:2; 51:6), gāzar (Ps. 90:10; Isa. 53:8); Gk. kóptō, apokóptō, ekkóptō, also aphairéō
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CUT; CUTTING
CUT; CUTTING([כָּרַת‎, karath], [גָּדַע‎, gadhà], [כָּחַד‎, kachadh], [נָתַח‎, nathach]; [ἀποκόπτω, apokopto], [ἐκκόπτω, ekkopto]): Many Hebrew words are translated “cut.” Of these karath, “to cut down, out, off,” is the most frequent. As “cut off” it is used in the sense of laying or destroying
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Cut
cut. This term, which renders several Greek and Hebrew words, is often used in a literal sense. A few examples are the following: David dropped Goliath with a stone and “cut off” his head (kārat H4162, 1 Sam. 17:51); on another occasion, David “cut off” part of Saul’s robe (24:4–5); the sacrificial
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Cut, Cutting
CUT, CUTTING (כָּרַת‎, kārath, גָּדַע‎, gādha‛, כָּחַד‎, kāḥadh, נָתַח‎, nāthaḥ; ἀποκόπτω, apokóptō, ἐκκόπτω, ekkóptō): Many Heb words are trd “cut.” Of these kārath, “to cut down, out, off,” is the most frequent. As “cut off” it is used in the sense of laying or destroying (Gen 9:11; Dt 12:29;