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Cush (region)
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Kush
Kush (כּוּשׁ‎, kush). Also rendered “Cush.” The region of the upper Nile, south of Egypt, corresponding roughly to modern Ethiopia; associated sometimes with the Sabeans of Sheba of Arabia.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Ethiopia (Place)
ETHIOPIA (PLACE) [Gk Aithiopia (Αἰθιοπια)]. ETHIOPIAN. The place name “Ethiopia” (possibly meaning “land of the people of burnt faces,” i.e., dark skin; cf. Jer 13:23) appears, as such, only once in the Bible (Acts 8:27), but in the LXX it usually translates the Heb kūš (Cush), a name which appears
Kush (Place)
KUSH (PLACE). From the early 12th Dynasty the name Kush applied to the territory lying S of Semna at the 2d cataract on the Nile river, and was often paired with Wawat (Lower Nubia) between the 1st and 2d cataracts (Posener 1958). The name was later extended as a term for Nubia in general. Both the region
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Cush (Place)
Cush (Place). Egyptian, Akkadian, and Hebrew term broadly referring to the countries of the Upper Nile south of Egypt. In a narrower sense Cush consisted of the territory between the 2nd and 4th cataracts of the Nile, roughly the present northern Sudan (equivalent to ancient Nubia). The OT generally
Ethiopia
Ethiopia. In the OT, Ethiopia was generally referred to as Cush (Gn 10:6; 1 Chr 1:8; Is 11:11 kjv), which is a transliteration of the only Hebrew word used to describe the land lying to the south of Egypt. The Greek version, however, spoke of this territory as Ethiopia, and kept the name Cush for the
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Cush
Cush koosh [Heb. kûš]. A geographical name referring to (1) a region in Africa, identified with Nubia or Ethiopia, and (2) a region in Mesopotamia, identified with the Kassites. The Hebrew term possibly has other references in certain texts, but there is no agreement on the identification (cf. 2 Ch.
Ethiopia
Ethiopia ē-thi-ōʹpēə [Heb. kûš; Gk. Aithiopia]; AV also CUSH (Isa. 11:11); NEB also CUSH, NUBIA. A geographical term derived ultimately either from Gk. aíthops, “red (face),” or from aíthō plus óps, “burnt face” (cf. Jer. 13:23). “Ethiopia (n)” in the RSV of the OT translates Heb. kûš (î),
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Cush (Place)
CUSH (Place) Egyptian, Akkadian, and Hebrew term broadly referring to the countries of the Upper Nile south of Egypt. In a narrower sense Cush consisted of the territory between the second and fourth cataracts of the Nile, roughly the present northern Sudan (equivalent to ancient Nubia). The OT generally
Ethiopia
ETHIOPIA In the OT, Ethiopia was generally referred to as Cush (Gn 10:6; 1 Chr 1:8; Is 11:11, kjv), which is a transliteration of the only Hebrew word used to describe the land lying to the south of Egypt. The Greek version, however, spoke of this territory as Ethiopia and kept the name Cush for the
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Ethiopia
Ethiopia (ee´thee-oh´pee-uh; Heb. Cush; Gk. Aithiopia) or Nubia, the ancient name of the Nile Valley region between the first and second cataracts south of Aswan, roughly equivalent with modern Sudan. In Homer’s Odyssey (sixth century bce), Ethiopia appears to cover a vast area, including parts of modern
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Cush
CUSH1. The son, possibly the eldest, of Ham and grandson of Noah (Gen 10:6–8). He was the father of several sons, or nations, including Nimrod.2. A Benjamite enemy of David, according to the ancient title of Ps 7.3. The people and land of Cush. The word is usually but not consistently translated Ethiopia
Ethiopia
ETHIOPIA, ETHIOPIAN. Cush (Heb. kûsh, borrowed from Egyptian kƷsh) in most of its OT occurences refers to the land variously known as Ethiopia, Nubia or the Sudan. It is located S of Egypt (therefore its frequent bracketing with Egypt; cf. (Gen 10:6–8; 1 Chr 1:8–10; Ps 68:31; Isa 11:11; 20:3–5; 43:3;
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Cush
CUSH. 1. Classed under Ham, and father of the hunter Nimrod (Gn. 10:6–8; 1 Ch. 1:8–10).2. A region encompassed by the river Gihon (Gn. 2:13); probably in W Asia and unrelated to 4 below; see E. A. Speiser in Festschrift Johannes Friedrich, 1959, pp. 473–485.3. A Benjaminite, some utterance of whom
Ethiopia
ETHIOPIA. Settled by the descendants of *Cush (Gn. 10:6), biblical Ethiopia (Gk. Aithiōps, ‘burnt face’, cf. Je. 13:23) is part of the kingdom of Nubia stretching from Aswan (*Seventh) S to the junction of the Nile near modern Khartoum. Invaded in prehistoric times by Hamites from Arabia and Asia, Ethiopia
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Cush (Place)
Cush (Heb. kûš) (PLACE)The geographic area S of Egypt and immediately E of the Red Sea, encompassing areas of modern Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen (Esth. 1:1; Isa. 11:11; 18:1; Zeph. 1:1). Modern Western scholarship differentiates between African Cush and Arabian Cush. Some feel
Ethiopia
Ethiopia (Gk. Aithiopia)The ancient region S of Egypt and encompassing the entire area of modern Sudan. The northernmost point was close to the Egyptian town of Syene (Aswan), at the first cataract of the Nile River (Ezek. 29:10; Heb. kûš). Its southern boundaries extended to modern Ethiopia and Eritrea.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ethiopia
Ethiopia [ēˊthĭ ōˊpĭ ə] (Heb.kûš; Gk. Aithiopia).† In biblical and other ancient usage, the territory of dark-skinned peoples south of Egypt.
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Ethiopia; Cush
ETHIOPIA; CUSH Named Cush in the Hebrew Bible and Cash in the Egyptian sources, Ethiopia is first mentioned in Genesis (2:13) as the land encompassed by the River Gihon, which flowed from the Garden of Eden. Situated in the Nile Valley between the second and the fourth cataracts, it was identified from
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Ethiopia
ETHIOPIA also Cush. A country to the south of Egypt, corresponding to ancient Nubia and modern Sudan, with its territories stretching to modern Saudi Arabia and Yemen and all the way south to modern Ethiopia and Eritrea. The name Ethiopia appears only once in Scripture, in Acts 8:27, although the Septuagint