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Cunning
Clever • Devious • Policy • Sleight
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Cunning
Cunning [Heb. ḥāḇar); AV “never so wisely”; NEB SKILFUL; [ḥēp̱eś-̀plot’] (Ps. 64:6); AV DILIGENT; [̀oqbâ] (2 K. 10:19); AV SUBTILTY; NEB OUT-WITTED; [̀āram] (1 S. 23:22); AV SUBTILLY; NEB CRAFTY; [̀ormâ] (Josh. 9:4); AV WILILY; NEB RUSE; [śeḵel]; AV POLICY; NEB “very active”; [tārmâ-̀deceitfulness’]
Policy
Policy [Heb. śeḵel (Dnl. 8:25); Gk. panoúrgos (Jth. 11:8), boulé¯ (1 Macc. 8:4), straté̄gēma (2 Macc. 14:29), stratēgéō (2 Macc. 14:31)]. The AV uses this term in an obsolete way for “cunning” (Dnl. 8:25), “strategy” (Jth. 11:8), “planning” (1 Macc. 8:4), “stratagem” (2 Macc. 14:29), and “outwit” (2
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Sleight
SLEIGHT. av rendering (rsv ‘cunning’ of Gk. kybeia, ‘dice-playing’, Eph. 4:14 (cf. kybeuō, ‘to deceive’, in Epictetus 2. 19; 3. 21). neb approaches the Greek differently from av and rsv, and renders the last part of the verse ‘dupes of crafty rogues and their deceitful schemes’. Paul is warning against
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CUNNING
CUNNING<kun’-ing> ([חָכָם‎, chakham], [חָשַׁב‎, chashabh]): In Bible-English “cunning” means always “wise” or “skilful”; the word does not occur in the bad sense, and it is found in the Old Testament only. The chief Hebrew words are chakham, “wise,” “skilful” (2 Chronicles 2:7 the King James
POLICY
POLICY<pol’-i-si>: Literally “method of government,” and so “ability to manage affairs.” In a bad sense, “cunning,” “craft,” in Daniel 8:25 ([שֶׂכֶל, sekhel], “understanding”); in a good sense in 1 Macc 8:4 ([βουλή, boule], “counsel”); also in the King James Version 2 Macc 13:18;
SLEIGHT
SLEIGHT<slit>: No connection with “slight,” but from the same root as “sly” and so = “cunning.” So in Ephesians 4:14, “sleight of men,” for [κυβεία, kubeia], “dice-plalying” (compare “cube”) “gamblers’ tricks” “trickery.”
Pocket Dictionary of Ethics
Public Policy
public policy. The decisions of a government regarding or affecting the relationships or interactions among the persons and institutions under its jurisdiction; the social goals that a particular government officially advocates or seeks to foster. Public policy encompasses both procedural and regulatory
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Cunning
cunning. This word (from Middle English cunnen, “to know”) is used by the KJV often in the sense of “skillful” or the like. It occurs prominently in the latter part of the book of Exodus, especially in the expression “cunning work,” which renders Hebrew maʿăśēh ḥōšēb (H5126 + H3110, lit., “work
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Cunning
CUNNING, kunʹing (חָכָם‎, ḥākhām, חָשַׁב‎, ḥāshabh): In Bible-English “cunning” means always “wise” or “skilful”; the word does not occur in the bad sense, and it is found in the OT only. The chief Heb words are ḥākhām, “wise,” “skilful” (2 Ch 2:7 AV “a man cunning to work in gold”; ver 13; Isa
Policy
POLICY, pol′i-si: Lit. “method of government,” and so “ability to manage affairs.” In a bad sense, “cunning,” “craft,” in Dnl 8:25 (שֶׂכֶל‎, sekhel, “understanding”); in a good sense in 1 Macc 8:4 (βουλή, boulḗ, “counsel”); also in AV 2 Macc 13:18; 14:29, 31 (μέθοδος, méthodos, στρατήγημα, stratḗgēma,
Sleight
SLEIGHT, slīt: No connection with “slight,” but from the same root as “sly” and so = “cunning.” So in Eph 4:14, “sleight of men,” for κυβεία, kubeía, “dice-playing” (cf “cube”), “gamblers’ tricks,” “trickery.”