Loading…
Cummin
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Cummin
Cumin (כַּמֹּן‎, kammon; κύμινον, kyminon). Also cummin. An herb used in the making of bread and also used as a disinfectant (e.g., Isa 28:25; Matt 23:23).
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Cummin
Cummin. Herb of the carrot family cultivated for its aromatic seeds, which are used for seasoning food (Is 28:25, 27; Mt 23:23).See Food and Food Preparation; Plants.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Cummin
Cummin kumʹən [Heb. kammōn; Gk. kýminon] (Isa. 28:25, 27; Mt. 23:23). The common annual, Cuminum cyminum L., a small plant bearing aromatic seeds which were used as a condiment and carminative. The usual spelling today is “cumin.” In antiquity the best cummin grew in Ethiopia. The Maltese reportedly
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Cummin
CUMMIN Herb of the carrot family cultivated for its aromatic seeds, which are used for seasoning food (Is 28:25–27; Mt 23:23). See Food and Food Preparation; Plants.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Cummin
cummin (kuh´min; Cuminum cyminum), a cultivated herb whose tiny aromatic seeds were harvested by beating the stalks with a rod (Isa. 28:25, 27). It was used medicinally, as a perfume oil, and as a seasoning for stews and breads. Paying a tithe on cummin symbolizes scrupulous attention to details of the
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Cumin
CuminCuminum cyminum L., an herb whose seeds are ground to make a pungent spice which is often added to bread. Cumin (Heb. kammōn; Gk. kýminon) is sown like grain (Isa. 28:25–27). Jesus chides the scribes and Pharisees for expending energy on the tithe of cumin (Deut. 14:22–23) and disregarding justice,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Cummin
Cummin (Heb. kammōn; Gk. kýminon). A common annual (Cuminum cyminum L.), spelled “cumin” today, included among those seeds sown by the farmer (Isa. 28:25) and threshed with a rod (v. 27). At Matt. 23:23 Jesus chides the scribes and Pharisees for tithing cummin while ignoring that the Mosaic law
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Cumin
CUMIN A plant whose seeds are used for spice and relish. The seeds were harvested by beating the plant with a rod (Isa 28:27). A tithe was required of even such a relatively insignificant crop under Jewish law. Thus Jesus said of the Pharisees: “For you tithe mint and dill, and cumin, and have neglected
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Cummin
Cummin, one of the cultivated plants of Palestine. Isa. 28:25, 27; Matt. 23:23. It is an umbelliferous plant something like fennel. The seeds have a bitterish warm taste and an aromatic flavor. The Maltese are said to grow it at the present day, and to thresh it in the manner described by Isaiah.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Cummin
Cummin(Heb. kammon; i.e., a “condiment”), the fruit or seed of an umbelliferous plant, the Cuminum sativum, still extensively cultivated in the East. Its fruit is mentioned in Isa. 28:25, 27. In the New Testament it is mentioned in Matt. 23:23, where our Lord pronounces a “woe” on the scribes and Pharisees,
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Cummin
Cummincummin (Cuminium cyminum), a cultivated herb whose tiny aromatic seeds were harvested by beating the stalks with a rod (Isa. 28:25, 27). It was used medicinally, as a perfume oil, and as a seasoning for stews and breads. Jesus uses the tithing even of those tiny seeds while not observing the
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CUMMIN
CUMMIN<kum’-in> ([כַּמֹּן‎, kammon]; [κύμινον, kuminon]): The seed of the herb Cuminum cyminum (Natural Order Umbelliferae). It has carminative properties and is used for flavoring various dishes, especially during fasts. In flavor and appearance it resembles caraway, though it is less agreeable to
See also
Topics & Themes