Loading…
Cult place
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
High Place, Critical Issues
High Place, Critical Issues (בָּמָה‎, bamah). Offers an overview of the structure, forms, and functions of high places—a type of religious installation in ancient Israel.
High Places
High Place (בָּמָה‎, bamah). The high places were common sites of worship in the ancient Near East, named after their common location at the summits of hills or ridges.In the Bible, the high places were sites of worship. They were often treated as unsanctioned for worshiping Yahweh, and typically located
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
High Place
HIGH PLACE (Heb bāmâ (בָּמָה)). A type of cultic installation in ancient Israel. The precise architecture and purpose of high places has been a subject of considerable disagreement.A. History of Interpretation1. Etymological Inferences2. Archaeological Influences3. Generalizing TendenciesB. The
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Bamah
Bamah. Hebrew word meaning height, ridge, or elevation in the topography of the land (2 Sm 1:19, 25; 22:34); transliterated into English once (Ez 20:29). It is a term designating hills or mountains overlooking the Arnon River (Nm 21:28). The plural form (Bamoth) alone or as the first part of a compound
High Place
High Place. Phrase commonly translated from the Hebrew bāmāh (pl., bōmah) which apparently derived from a word originally meaning “the back or ridge of an animal.” Thus it came to refer to a height or hill or a stone burial cairn. Usually it was an elevated worship center, such as the ones referred
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Bamah
Bamah bäʹmə, bāʹmə [Heb. bāmâ—‘high place’]; NEB “hill-shrine.” The word appears in Ezk. 20:29, where reference is made to former “high-place worship,” the prophet speaking with contempt of such manner of worship. It is possible that reference is made to a prominent high place like the one at Gibeon
High Place
High Place [Heb. bāmâ]. The Hebrews undoubtedly borrowed the word (as well as the installation itself) from the Canaanites, who in turn derived it from a common Semitic vocabulary where (in Akkadian and Ugaritic) it meant literally “back” or “ridge.” It is now recognized that it could have the same
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Bamah
BAMAH Hebrew word meaning height, ridge, or elevation in the topography of the land (2 Sm 1:19, 25; 22:34); transliterated into English once (Ez 20:29; see nlt). It is a term designating hills or mountains overlooking the Arnon River (Nm 21:28). The plural form (Bamoth) alone or as the first part of
High Place
HIGH PLACE Phrase commonly translated from the Hebrew bamah, which apparently derived from a word originally meaning “the back (or ridge) of an animal.” Thus it came to refer to a height or hill or a stone burial cairn. Usually it was an elevated worship center, such as the ones referred to in Numbers
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
High Place
high place, an elevated location used for religious rites. In the nrsv, “high place” typically translates Hebrew bamah (pl. bamot). In certain contexts, this word can refer to geographic features without any religious or cultic connotation (e.g., “high mountains” in Deut. 12:2; “heights (of the earth)”
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Bamah
BAMAH. The word is retained in its Heb. form only in Ezk 20:29. Doubtless the prophet’s question is a contemptuous play on words regarding the people’s worship at a heathen high place: “What is the high place bāmâ whereunto ye go [a form of the verb bâ˒]” See Bamoth.
High Place
HIGH PLACE. The original meaning was simply that of a mountain or hill top (Deut 32:13; 2 Sam 1:19, 25). The overwhelming proportion of uses, however, indicate sanctuaries on an elevated area. These were Canaanite in origin. They may have been used for funeral rites and certainly were often the scenes
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
High Place
HIGH PLACE. The Heb. word bāmâ, rendered ‘high place’ by av, rsv and jb, is used over 100 times in MT and in two distinct ways: of heights in a literal sense and of shrines. neb renders ‘heights’ and ‘hill shrine’.The 20 non-cultic uses are all in the plural form and in poetic passages. In contrast
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
High Place
High PlaceMost commonly a sacred site, although a precise description remains elusive. Heb. bāmâ (pl. bāmôṯ) is most commonly found in the condemnatory lists of illegitimate worship practices by Israelite and Judean kings and their subjects, but in those many instances the hated bāmâ is not described.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
High Place
High Place (Heb. bāmâ).† A place of worship, located on hilltops or man-made platforms. Old Testament accounts usually associate high places with pagan religious practices.High places were a common fixture of Canaanite religion when the Israelites entered Palestine. The common ancient Near Eastern
Catholic Bible Dictionary
High Places
HIGH PLACES Open-air cultic sites. The term “high place” is the usual translation of these worship sites. Although these sites were often located on hills, they were not all so placed (cf. 1 Kgs 11:7; 2 Kgs 16:4, 17:9–10; Jer 7:31, 32:35). They could be sited on mountaintops (Deut 32:13; Isa 58:14; Amos
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
‘High Places’, the
‘High Places’, the (Heb. הַבָּמוֹת). In the OT the local (usually hill-top) sanctuaries other than *Jerusalem at which Yahweh was worshipped with sacrifice in early times. Among the most renowned were *Bethel and Gibeon. Worship at these sites, which had Canaanite affinities and was often accompanied