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Crossbeam
Buildings and structures
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Beam
Beam. 1. Weaver’s beam—round wooden roller on which the cloth or carpet was wound during the weaving process in Bible times. The spears of the giant Goliath (1 Sm 17:7; 2 Sm 21:19; 1 Chr 20:5) and an Egyptian killed by Benaiah, one of David’s mighty men (1 Chr 11:23) were compared to a weaver’s beam.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Rafter
Rafter A translation used by the RSV in four places. In Cant. 1:17 it renders Heb. (Q) rāhîṭ (NEB “ceilings”), which is of uncertain meaning but from the context appears to refer to the woodwork of a roof. The RSV and NEB also read “rafters” in three texts where the MT is believed to have suffered
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Beam
BEAM1. Weaver’s beam—round wooden roller on which the cloth or carpet was wound during the weaving process in Bible times. The spears of the giant Goliath (1 Sm 17:7; 2 Sm 21:19; 1 Chr 20:5) and an Egyptian killed by Benaiah, one of David’s mighty men (1 Chr 11:23), were compared to a weaver’s beam.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Beam
beam, a shaped piece of wood whose length far exceeds its girth. In the Bible, “beam” refers to part of a loom and to timbers for construction of both buildings and gates. The “weaver’s beam” was the large bar on which the warp cords were wound. It served as the model for a huge spear handle in biblical
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Beam
BEAM. A word used to translate several Heb. and Gr. terms referring to large timbers in constructing floors and ceilings or roofs of buildings (1 Kgs 6:9; 7:2–3; 2 Kgs 6:2, 5). The word also refers to the large bar on which the warp was wound in the loom, called a weaver’s beam” (Jdg 16:14; 1 Sam 17:7;
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Beam
BeamEight Hebrew, one Aramaic, and two Greek words are translated variously as “beam,” “plank,” “timber,” “pillar,” “rafter,” and “board.” The most common occurrences of these terms in the OT are in the context of building construction, especially of Solomon’s temple (1 Kgs. 6:6, 9, 36; 7:6). The roofs
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Beam
Beamoccurs in the Authorized Version as the rendering of various Hebrew words. In 1 Sam. 17:7, it means a weaver’s frame or principal beam; in Hab. 2:11, a crossbeam or girder; 2 Kings 6:2, 5, a cross-piece or rafter of a house; 1 Kings 7:6, an architectural ornament as a projecting step or moulding;
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Beam
Beambeam, a shaped piece of wood whose length far exceeds its girth. In the Bible, beam refers to part of a loom and to timbers for construction, the latter used in both buildings and gates. The ‘weaver’s beam’ was the large bar on which the warp cords were wound. It served as the model for a huge
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Beam
BEAM — a huge timber that supports the roof and floor of a large building. Heavy wooden beams, cut from the famed cedars of Lebanon, were used in the construction of the Temple in Solomon’s time (1 Kin. 6:36). Also see Architecture.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
BEAM
BEAM<bem>: The word is used to translate various Old Testament terms:1. ססִנֵגֵּב‎[gebh] (1 Kings 6:9), צֵלָע‎ [tselà], “a rib” (1 Kings 7:3), קוּרָה‎ [qurah] (2 Chronicles 3:7; 34:11; Song 1:17), all refer to constructional beams used in buildings for roofing and upper floors, main
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Beam
Beam. Thrown on my beam-ends. Driven to my last shift. A ship is said to be on her beam-ends when she is laid by a heavy gale completely on her beams or sides. Not unfrequently the only means of righting her in such a case is to cut away her masts.On the starboard beam. A distant point out at sea on
Mote
Mote and Beam (Matt. 7:3–5). In alio pedicŭlum video, in te rĭcĭnum non vides (Petronius). Here pediculum means a louse, and ricinum a tyke.