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Cripple
Abject • Impotence • Impotent • Powerlessness
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Cripple
Cripple [Heb. nēḵeh] (Ps. 35:15); AV ABJECT; NEB RUFFIAN; [Gk. asthenḗs] (Acts 4:9); AV IMPOTENT MAN; NEB SICK MAN; [chōlós] (14:8); NEB LAME; CRIPPLED [Heb. nāḵēh] (2 S. 4:4; 9:3); AV LAME; NEB also “a cripple, lame”; [šāḇar] (Ezk. 34:4, 16); AV BROKEN; NEB HURT. For Ps. 35:15, BH and KoB
Impotent
ImpotentUsed by the AV for Gk. adýnatos, “powerless” (“could not use,” Acts 14:8), asthené̄s, “without strength” (“cripple,” Acts 4:9), and asthenéō, “be without strength” (“invalid,” Jn. 5:3; “sick man,” v 7). The English term is used to characterize those who are paralyzed or crippled. In this
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Abject
ABJECT. A plural noun in (Ps 35:15) from Heb. nēkeh probably meaning “slanderers” or “railers.” RSV has “cripples.”
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Impotent
IMPOTENT. In the KJV, a general term indicating disablement. The NASB renders “sick” (John 5:3, 7; Acts 4:9; the NIV has “invalid” and “cripple” respectively) and “without strength” (14:8; NIV, “crippled”).
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CRIPPLE
CRIPPLE<krip’-’-l> ([χωλός, cholos]): Only occurs in Acts 14:8, denoting the congenitally lame man at Lystra. In the King James Version (1611) the word is spelled “creeple.” It originally meant one whose body is bent together as in the attitude of creeping. This was probably a case of infantile
ABJECT
ABJECT<ab’-jekt>: Only as a noun, and but once (Psalm 35:15) for [nekheh], literally, “smitten ones,” i.e. “men of the lowest grade” (Hengstenberg, Delitzsch), “the rabble,” defined by the succeeding clause as those of such inferior station that they were unknown.
IMPOTENT
IMPOTENT<im’-po-tent> ([ἀσθενέω, astheneo], [ἀδύνατος, adunatos]): The verb signifies “to be without strength,” and derivatives of it are used in Jn 5:3, 7 the King James Version and Acts 4:9 to characterize the paralyzed man at Bethesda and the cripple at the Temple gate. For the same condition
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Impotence
IMPOTENCE.—The single instance of our Lord’s miracles specifically classified under this head is recorded in Jn 5:2–9, where the sufferer is described as ὁ ἀσθενῶν (AV ‘the impotent man,’ RV ‘the sick man’). The features of the ease are its long continuance (for thirty-eight years); and the association
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Impotent
IMPOTENT Lacking power, strength, or vigor; helpless. Impotence in the KJV never refers to sexual inability. Modern translations replace “impotent” with other terms: “cripple” (Acts 4:9 NIV); “disabled” (John 5:3 NIV); “invalid” (John 5:3 NRSV); “sick” (John 5:3, 7; Acts 4:9 NASB). Modern translations
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Abject
abject. The plural form “abjects” (NIV “attackers”) is used by the KJV to describe some low outcasts who gathered together against the psalmist (Ps. 35:15). It renders the unique Hebrew word nēkîm (possibly from nākâ H5782, “to smite”), which is of doubtful meaning and may be corrupt (RSV “cripples”;
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Cripple
CRIPPLE, krip´’l (χωλός, chōlós): Only occurs in Acts 14:8, denoting the congenitally lame man at Lystra. In AV (1611) the word is spelled “creeple.” It originally meant one whose body is bent together as in the attitude of creeping. This was probably a case of infantile paralysis.
Abject
ABJECT, abʹjekt: Only as a noun, and but once (Ps 35:15) for נֵכֶה‎, nēkheh, lit. “smitten ones,” i.e. “men of the lowest grade” (Hengstenberg, Delitzsch), “the rabble,” defined by the succeeding clause as those of such inferior station that they were unknown.
Impotent
IMPOTENT, imʹpō̇-tent (ἀσθενέω, asthenéō, ἀδύνατος, adúnatos): The vb. signifies “to be without strength,” and derivatives of it are used in Jn 5:3, 7 AV and Acts 4:9 to characterize the paralyzed man at Bethesda and the cripple at the Temple gate. For the same condition of the Lystra lame man
See also
Topics & Themes