Loading…
Couch
Ouch
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Couch
Couch (verb) [Heb. rāḇaṣ] (Gen. 49:9, 25; Dt. 33:13; Ezk. 19:2); AV also LIE, LAY DOWN; NEB CROUCH, “made her lair”; [kāra‘] (Nu. 24:9); [šāḵēn] (Dt. 33:20); AV DWELL. The term “couch” is used by the RSV with reference to a lion crouching in readiness to spring on its prey (e.g., Dt. 33:20)
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Ouch
OUCH (ouch; pl. “ouches,” Heb. mishbṣôt, “woven together” in filigree fashion). An archaic term referring to the gold work, which not only served to fasten the stones upon the woven fabric of the ephod but formed at the same time clasps or brooches, by which the two parts of the ephod were fastened
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Couch
Couch(Gen. 49:4; 1 Chr. 5:1; Job 7:13; Ps. 6:6, etc.), a seat for repose or rest. (See BED.)
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
COUCH
COUCH<kouch> (substantive.).See BED.Couch (verb): [רָבַץ‎, rabhats], “to crouch,” “lurk,” as a beast in readiness to spring on its prey. “If thou doest not well, sin coucheth at the door” (Genesis 4:7, the King James Version “lieth”), waiting for it to open. Cain is warned to beware of
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Couch
Couch, something spread (Gen. 49:4); something to lie upon (Job 7:13); a little bed (Luke 5:19, 24); a pallet (Acts 5:15). The verb “to couch” has the sense of to lie (Gen. 49:9; Deut. 33:13; Job 38:40).
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Couch
COUCH.—The word ‘couch’ is found in Lk 5:19, 24 (as tr. of κλινίδιον), where Mt 9:2, 6 and Mk 2:4, 11 have ‘bed’ (κλίνη and κράβαττος respectively; κλίνη also in Lk 5:18). It is found also in RVm of Mk 7:4 as tr. of κλίνη. In Ac 5:15, where the AV and RV have ‘beds and couches,’ the correct text
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Couch
couch. This English term can be used to render several Hebrew words, such as miṭṭâ H4753 (e.g., 1 Sam. 28:23) and miškāb H5435 (e.g., Job 7:13), both of which can also be translated “bed” (cf. their parallel use in Amos 6:4). In the NT, the KJV uses “couch” three times to render Greek klinidion
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Couch
CouchAn important furniture type in the Greek and Roman house; its function was to accommodate sleeping and resting, eating and drinking. The c. was also used in funerary and cult contexts. Nomenclature was variable, but in late antiquity the most common usages included the following: grabatus (pallet):
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Couch
COUCH, kouch (subst.). See Bed.Couch (vb.): (רָבַץ‎, rābhaç, “to crouch,” “lurk,” as a beast in readiness to spring on its prey. “If thou doest not well, sin coucheth at the door” (Gen 4:7, AV “lieth”), waiting for it to open. Cain is warned to beware of the first temptations to evil, in his case esp.
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
COUCH
COUCH [מִשְׁכָּבyatsuaʿ, מִטָּהmittah, עֶרֶשׂmishkav, יָצוּעַʿeres; κλίνη klinē, κοίτη koitē, στρῶμα strōma]. A word used interchangeably with bed, at the discretion of the translator, for various Hebrew words. Couches functioned primarily as a means of reclining during meals (Esth 7:8; Tob
See also
Topics & Themes
Bed
Related
Bed