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Corruption
Corruption of Body
Dictionaries
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Corruption
CORRUPTION. This word translates various nouns from the Heb. root shāḥat (OT) and Gr. root phtheirō (NT), “to ruin,” “destroy.” Corruption may be physical: blemished animals (Lev 22:25); disfigured faces (Dan 10:8): desecrated shrine, whose high place is therefore called “mount of corruption” (q.v.;
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Corruption
CORRUPTION (Gk. phthora, diaphthora) in evv, and especially av, usually connotes the transience of the present world order. In Rom. 8:21 it is used of the liability of the material universe to change and decay; contrast the ‘imperishable’ (Gk. aphthartos) inheritance reserved for believers (1 Pet. 1:4).
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Corruption
CORRUPTION. The rendering of several Heb. and Gk. words, signifying (1) the decay of the body (Job 17:14; Ps. 16:10, KJV; NASB renders “the pit,” NIV “decay”); (2) the blemishes that rendered an animal unfit for sacrifice (Lev. 22:25); (3) the demoralization of heart and life through sin (Gen. 6:12;
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Corruption
CORRUPTION — decay of the body (Acts 2:27, 31) and degradation of human life through the power of sin (2 Pet. 1:4). But because of the resurrection of Christ our bodies, sown in corruption (subject to the decay and dissolution of organic matter), will be raised in incorruption (1 Cor. 15:42, 50–54).
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Corruption
CorruptionCorruption is a decay into a state of rottenness. Although the Bible supplies images of physical corruption-the stench in Egypt after some of the plagues; the worm-infested manna that some people left until the sabbath (Ex 16:20); the whitewashed tombs to which Jesus compares the Pharisees,
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CORRUPTION
CORRUPTION<ko-rup’-shun>: The Hebrew words [מִשְׁחָת‎, mishchath], [מַשְׁחָת‎, mashchath], [מַשְׁחִית‎, mashchith], and their Greek equivalents, [φθορά, phthora], and [διαφθορά, diaphthora], with numerous derivatives and cognate verbs, imply primarily physical degeneration and decay (Job 17:14; Acts
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Corruption
CORRUPTION Used especially in the KJV to denote the transient nature of the material world—that is, the world’s bent toward change and decay (Rom. 8:21; 1 Cor. 15:42–57; 1 Pet. 1:4). The world’s corruption stands in contrast to the permanent, eternal nature of the resurrection hope.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Corruption
corruption. The KJV uses this term mainly to render Hebrew šaḥat H8846 (e.g., Ps. 16:10; NIV, “decay”; NRSV, “the Pit”) and Greek diaphthora G1426 (e.g., Acts 2:27) in passages that refer to the decaying of the physical body (more broadly of creation, Rom. 8:21). See death; Sheol. The word and its
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Corruption
CORRUPTION, kō̇-rupʹshun: The Heb words מִשְׁחָת‎, mishḥāth, מַשְׁחָת‎, mashḥāth, מַשְׁחִית‎, mashḥīth, and their Gr equivalents, φθορά, phthorá, and διαφθορά, diaphthorá, with numerous derivatives and cognate vbs., imply primarily physical degeneration and decay (Job 17:14; Acts 2:27, etc). The
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
CORRUPTION
CORRUPTION [שְׁאוֹלsheʾol; διαφθορά diaphthora, φθορά phthora]. Diaphthora and phthora refer to a place called The PIT or SHEOL (LXX Ps 15:10 [16:10]; Job 33:28), or to an act of corruption as in Paul’s letters where phthora is the decay of the body at the time of death. Under the influence of Jewish
Key passages
1 Esd 1:49

Now the men who lead the people and the priests committed many acts of impiety, and they committed more acts of lawlessness than all the impurities of all the nations, and they defiled the temple of the Lord that was dedicated in Jerusalem.

See also
Ge 6:11–13;
See also
Topics & Themes