Loading…
Convict
Conviction • Convince • Convincing
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Convict
Convict [Gk. elénchō, exelénchō (Jude 15)]; AV CONVINCE; NEB also “prove in the wrong” (Jn. 8:46, RSV “convict of sin”), “bring conviction” (1 Cor. 14:24); the RSV “convicts himself” in 2 S. 14:13 is a paraphrase of the Hebrew, which is literally “(he speaks) as guilty” (ke’āšēm), AV “as one
Convince
Convince Archaic in the AV for “convict” (Gk. elénchō, Jn. 8:46; 1 Cor. 14:24; Tit. 1:9; Jas. 2:9; exelénchō, Jude 15) and for “confute” (Heb. yāḵaḥ, Job 32:12; Gk. diakatelénchomai, Acts 18:28). In the RSV the archaic usage seems to be retained in Jn. 16:8 (elénchō; AV “reprove”; NEB “confute,”
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Conviction
CONVICTION — the process of being condemned by one’s own conscience as a sinner because of God’s demands. The idea of conviction is a major theme of Scripture, although the word is rarely used (Psalm 32; 51; Acts 2:37; Rom. 7:7–25). The agent of conviction is the Holy Spirit (John 16:7–11); and the means
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CONVICT; CONVICTION
CONVICT; CONVICTION<kon-vikt’>, <kon-vik’-shun> ([ἐλέγχω, elegcho] and compounds, “to prove guilty”): Usual translation of English Versions of the Bible, where the King James Version has “convince,” as in John 8:46; Titus 1:9; James 2:9; once also replacing the King James Version “reprove” (John
CONVINCE
CONVINCE<kon-vins’> ([ἐλέγχω, elegcho]): Another form etymologically of “convict,” means to bring to a decision concerning the truth or the falsehood of a proposition (Job 32:12). As usually applied to what is of a more individual and private character, and having reference to what is either good
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Convict
convict. This English verb is used a few times in Bible versions, primarily to render Greek elenchō G1794, which can also be translated “declare, expose, prove, convince, correct, rebuke” (e.g., Jn. 3:20, “for fear that his deeds will be exposed”; Lk. 3:19, “when John rebuked Herod”; Tit. 1:9, “refute
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Convict, Conviction
CONVICT, kon-viktʹ, CONVICTION, kon-vikʹ-shun (ἐλέγχω, elégchō, and compounds, “to prove guilty”): Usual tr of EV, where AV has “convince,” as in Jn 8:46; Tit 1:9; Jas 2:9; once also replacing AV “reprove” (Jn 16:8), while RV changes AV “convince” into “reprove” in 1 Cor 14:24. It always implies the
Convince
CONVINCE, kon-vinsʹ (ἐλέγχω, elégchō): Another form etymologically of “convict,” means to bring to a decision concerning the truth or the falsehood of a proposition (Job 32:12). As usually applied to what is of a more individual and private character, and having reference to what is either good or