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Common
Ordinary
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Common
Common In the OT “common” as opposed to “holy” is called Heb. ḥōl, as “common bread” (1 S. 21:4; NEB “ordinary bread”), i.e., other than the showbread or bread of the Presence; “common journey” (v 5, AV “common manner”; NEB “ordinary campaign”), i.e., other than a military expedition, for which David
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Common
Common (Heb. ḥōl; Gk. koinós).† In the Old Testament that which is not “holy” or consecrated is considered to be common, such as “common bread” (1 Sam. 21:4) as opposed to the Bread of the Presence. Common people (Lev. 4:27; Heb. ˓am hā˒āreṣ. “people of the land”) are “ordinary” people
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Ordinary
Ordinary. In canon law, an ecclesiastic in the exercise of the jurisdiction permanently and irremovably annexed to his office. Such jurisdiction extends over his rights of teaching, governing, adjudicating, and administering the Sacraments. In the RC Church the term covers, besides the Pope, diocesan
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
COMMON
COMMON<kom’-un>: [κοινός, koinos], in the classics, and primarily in the New Testament, means what is public, general, universal, as contrasted with [ἴδιος, idios], what is peculiar, individual, not shared with others. Thus, “common faith” (Titus 1:4), “common salvation” (Jude 1:3), refer
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Common
Comʹmon. The Greek word thus rendered in Acts 10:14 properly signifies what belongs to all; hence, what is of promiscuous use or not holy; and hence, with reference to meats, what is forbidden or unclean.
Pocket Dictionary of Liturgy & Worship
Ordinary
Ordinary. As distinct from the *Proper, the unchanging parts of the liturgy (e.g., the *Sanctus and the *Lord’s Prayer).
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Common
COMMON In the OT that which was common (alternately profane) was contrasted with that which was holy. Thus common bread was contrasted with the bread of the Presence (1 Sam. 21:4); the common journey was contrasted with the military campaign for which David and his men would need to be consecrated (1
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Common
common. This English term is used in Bible versions with various meanings (“shared, ordinary, public”). Of special interest is its use to render Hebrew ḥōl H2687, “profane, ritually neutral” (contrasted with qōdeš H7731, “holy”; see Lev. 10:10; 1 Sam. 21:4–5; Ezek. 22:26; 42:20; 44:23; 48:14–15).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Common
COMMON, komʹun: κονός, koinós, in the classics, and primarily in the NT, means what is public, general, universal, as contrasted with ἴδιος, ídios, what is peculiar, individual, not shared with others. Thus, “common faith” (Tit 1:4), “common salvation” (Jude ver 3), refer to that in which the experience
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
COMMON
COMMON. Old Testament Israel and New Testament Christianity had many common social values with those nations and cultures by which they found themselves surrounded or in which they were immersed. At the same time they attempted to maintain, in quite distinct ways, very tight social boundaries between