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Cohort
Detachment of Soldiers • Regiment
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Cohort
Cohort [Gk. speíra] (Acts 10:1; 21:31; 27:1); AV BAND. The tenth part of a legion, ordinarily about six hundred men. In Jn. 18:3, 12 the Greek word seems to be used loosely of a smaller body of soldiers, a detachment, detail; and in Mt. 27:27 par the RSV renders it “battalion.” See Army, Roman I.B.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Cohort
COHORT. The tenth part of a legion, usually about 600 men. The KJV has “band,” while ASV marg. has “cohort” (Mt 27:27; Mk 15:16; Acts 10:1; 21:31; 27:1). It may also be used of a small detail (Jn 18:3, 12, ASV marg.). A cohort was stationed in Jerusalem in the tower of Antonia adjacent to the temple
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Cohort
CohortA Roman military unit (Gk. speɩ́ra) comprised generally of 600 personnel (size could vary from 500 to 1000) under the leadership of a chilɩ́archos. Cohorts were either regular, i.e., one tenth of a legion, or auxiliary, not attached to a legion. Auxiliary cohorts were often divided ca. 4:1 between
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Regiment
REGIMENT — one of ten divisions of an ancient Roman legion. The traditional Roman legion consisted of 6,000 soldiers. A regiment, or cohort, consisted of about 600 men, although this number varied. The Book of Acts mentions the Italian Regiment (Acts 10:1; band, KJV; cohort, NRSV, REB, NASB) and the
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
COHORT
COHORT<ko’-hort>: In the Revised Version, margin of Matthew 27:27; Mark 15:16; John 18:3, 12; Acts 10:1; 21:31; 27:1, the translation of speira (the King James Version and the Revised Version (British and American), “band”); the tenth part of a legion; ordinarily about 600 men. In John
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Band
BAND.—A Roman legion, the full strength of which was about 6000 men, was divided into ten cohorts (600), and each cohort into three maniples (200). Greek writers use the word σπεῖρα, rendered ‘band’ in our versions, sometimes for maniple but usually for cohort; hence RVm has regularly ‘cohort.’ The
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Cohort
COHORT Roman military unit with capacity of 1,000 men; ten cohorts formed a legion. Cornelius (Acts 10:1) apparently belonged to a cohort of archers named the Cohors II Miliaria Italica Civium Romanorum Voluntariorum that had 1,000 members, Cornelius commanding 100 of them. Originally, the unit had been
Regiment
REGIMENT NIV term for “cohort,” a tenth of a legion (Acts 10:1; 27:1). See Cohort.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Cohort
cohort. Nominally the tenth part of a Roman legion, or 600 soldiers, but the actual number varied. Although this English term often has the general sense of “a group of people,” it is used by some versions in its military meaning to render Greek speira G5061 (NIV, “company of soldiers” in Matt. 27:27
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Cohort
COHORT, kōʹhort: In RVm of Mt 27:27; Mk 15:16; Jn 18:3, 12; Acts 10:1; 21:31; 27:1, the tr of speíra (AV and RV, “band”); the tenth part of a legion; ordinarily about 600 men. In Jn 18 the word seems to be used loosely of a smaller body of soldiers, a detachment, detail. See Army; Band.
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
COHORT
COHORT [σπεῖρα speira]. While posted in forts and strongholds to defend the borders and maintain the peace, a Roman cohort was nominally 600 infantrymen, but in Palestine auxiliary cohorts of local soldiers could be 500 to 1,000 troops. A speira mocked Jesus (Matt 27:27; Mark 15:16; John 18:12), and