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Codex
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Codex
Codex A literary format consisting of one or more groupings of sheets sewn together and bound. Introduced in the first century ad. An precursor to the modern book.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Codex
CODEX. The codex (pl. codices), or leaf book, of which the modern book with pages is a direct descendant, came into use as a medium of literature only in the early centuries of the Christian era. Although it was not a Christian invention, the codex was early favored in the Christian circles for the transcription
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Codex
Codex. Earliest form of the book, consisting of sheets of papyrus or vellum folded and bound together and enclosed between two wooden leaves or tablets.See Writing and Books.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Codex
CODEX* Earliest form of the book, consisting of sheets of papyrus or vellum folded and bound together and enclosed between two wooden leaves or tablets. See Writing.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Codex
codex (pl. codices), one of the two formats in which ancient manuscripts were written; the other is the scroll. A codex was made by placing sheets of papyrus or parchment on top of one another and folding them down the middle, producing a quire. Such a single-quire codex could become cumbersome when
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Codex
CodexA wooden tablet (or tablets connected with thongs laced through holes bored near the edges). The codex, the earliest form of book—which in Roman times began to replace the more cumbersome scroll—was first used in business and legal transactions. Later Romans experimented with a codex of parchment
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Codex
Codex. A wooden tablet (or tablets connected with thongs laced through holes bored near the edges). The codex, the earliest form of book—which in Roman times began to replace the more cumbersome scroll—was first used in business and legal transactions. Later Romans experimented with a codex of papyri
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Codex
CODEX A book made of separate sheets or “leaves” bound on one edge, like a modern book, in contrast to a papyrus scroll (see also Book). The codex first came into prominence in the first centuries a.d. It was the most common form of book used for Christian literature, and indeed some scholars believe
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Codex
Codexcodex, one of the two formats in which ancient manuscripts were written, the other being the scroll. The codex or leaf-book soon came to be used by Christians to differentiate their sacred books from the synagogue scrolls of the ot. A codex was made by placing sheets of papyrus or parchment on
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Codex
CODEX [COE dex] — the forerunner of the modern book. A codex was formed by folding several sheets of papyrus in the middle and sewing them together along the fold. More convenient for reading than the Scroll, the codex (plural, codices) could also be written on both sides. Also see Writing.
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Codex
Codex.—A name applied to ancient manuscripts, especially of the classics or of the Scriptures. Of the latter class the principal are the “Codex Sinaiticus,” discovered in 1844 and 1859 in the Monastery of Mount Sinai by Tischendorf, and the “Codex Vaticanus,” both of the fourth century; the “Codex Alexandrinus”
Dictionary of Theological Terms
Codex
CodexAn ancient Bible manuscript with leaves bound in book form. (See MSS.)
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