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Coat of mail
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Coat of Mail
Coat of Mail (שִׁרְיוֹן‎, shiryon). A breastplate formed from pieces of metal overlapping one another like fish scales (2 Chr 26:14; 1 Kgs 22:34; 1 Sam. 17:5, 38; Neh 4:16; Isa 59:17; Jer 46:4). For further information on warfare and defense, see this article: War in the Ancient Near East.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Coat of Mail
Coat of Mail. Piece of armor covering the body from the neck to the girdle, probably made of leather with small interlaced metal plates sewn onto it.See Arms and Warfare.
Habergeon
Habergeon. kjv translation for coat of mail, part of a soldier’s defensive armor (2 Chr 26:14; Neh 4:16; Jb 41:26).See Arms and Warfare.
Mail, Coat of
Mail, Coat of. Body armor consisting of small interlaced metal plates sewn onto a leather jacket.See Arms and Warfare.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Coat of Mail
Coat of Mail [Heb. širyôn, širyān] (1 S. 17:5, 38; 2 Ch. 26:14; Neh. 4:16 [MT 10]); AV also HABERGEON; [siryôn] (Jer. 46:4; 51:3); AV BRIGANDINE; [kep̱el siryôn] (Job 41:13 [MT 5]). See Weapons of War.
Brigandine
Brigandine [Heb. siryôn] (Jer. 46:4; 51:3, AV); RSV, NEB, COAT OF MAIL. See Weapons of War.
Habergeon
Habergeon habʹer-jan. A medieval coat of mail. The AV uses this term for Heb. taḥrāʾ (Ex. 28:32; 39:23; RSV “garment”), širyôn (2 Ch. 26:14; Neh. 4:16 [MT 10]; RSV “coat of mail”), and širyâ (Job 41:26 [MT 18]; RSV “javelin”). See Weapons of War.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Coat of Mail
COAT OF MAIL Piece of armor, covering the body from the neck to the girdle, probably made of leather with small interlaced metal places sewn onto it. See Armor and Weapons.
Habergeon
HABERGEON* kjv translation for coat of mail, part of a soldier’s defensive armor (2 Chr 26:14; Neh 4:16; Jb 41:26, nlt “javelin”). See Armor and Weapons.
Mail, Coat of
MAIL, COAT OF Body armor consisting of small interlaced metal plates sewn onto a leather jacket. See Armor and Weapons.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Coat of Mail
coat of mail, defensive armor consisting of overlapping plates of metal strung on leather or cloth. Cavalry and archers are identified as the warriors who typically wore it (Jer. 46:4; 51:3). Still, Goliath wore a coat of mail that was notably heavy (1 Sam. 17:5), and Saul initially clothed David in
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Corselet
CORSELET. Defensive armor for the body. It evidently refers to the protective covering for the chest, abdomen, and back. It is referred to as “breastplate,” “habergeon,” and “coat of mail.” Armor of this nature was worn by Nehemiah’s workers (Neh 4:16), by the soldiers of King Uzziah (2 Chr 26:14), by
Cuirass
CUIRASS. A coat of mail made of interwoven heavy metal wire or links, or a breastplate (1 Sam 17:5; Job 41:13, RSV; Neh 4:16, RSV; 2 Chr 26:14, RSV). See Armor; Breastplate; Coat of Mail.
Habergeon
HABERGEON1. An obsolete term for coat of mail or breastplate (2 Chr 26:14; Neh 4:16) to protect the neck and shoulders, but later reaching the thighs or knees. Goliath’s coat of mail (1 Sam 17:5) seems to have been a coat of leather covered with bronze scales, weighing c. 125 pounds. A fragment of such
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Coat of Mail
Coat of MailArmor consisting of 400–600 plates of metal, which were pierced and sewn to a cloth or leather undercoat. The plates overlapped to provide maximum protection; the armor was weakest at the joining of the sleeve to the tunic body and between the scales (1 Kgs. 22:34 = 2 Chr. 18:33). Such armor
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Coat of Mail
Coat of Mail (Heb. širyôn, širyān). † A leather jacket reinforced with metal scales (Heb. qaśeqaśśîm; 1 Sam. 17:5), worn over the torso. The weight of Goliath’s coat of mail was five thousand shekels of bronze (about 80 kgs. [176 lbs.]; 1 Sam. 17:5). According to 1 Kgs. 22:34; 2 Chr. 18:33
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Coat of mail
Coat of mailthe rendering of a Hebrew word meaning “glittering” (1 Sam. 17:5, 38). The same word in the plural form is translated “habergeons” in 2 Chr. 26:14 and Neh. 4:16. The “harness” (1 Kings 22:34), “breastplate” (Isa. 59:17), and “brigandine” (Jer. 46:4), were probably also corselets or coats
Brigandine
Brigandine(Jer. 46:4; 51:3), an obsolete English word denoting a scale coat of armour, or habergeon, worn by light-armed “brigands.” The Revised Version has “coat of mail.”
Habergeon
Habergeonan Old English word for breastplate. In Job 41:26 (Heb. shiryah it is properly a “coat of mail;” the Revised Version has “pointed shaft.” In Ex. 28:32, 39:23, it denotes a military garment strongly and thickly woven and covered with mail round the neck and breast. Such linen corselets have
Mail, Coat of
Mail, Coat of“a corselet of scales,” a cuirass formed of pieces of metal overlapping each other, like fish-scales (1 Sam. 17:5); also (38) a corselet or garment thus encased.
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Coat of Mail
Coat of Mailcoat of mail (kjv: ‘brigandine’), defensive armor consisting of overlapping plates of metal strung on leather or cloth. Cavalrymen and archers are identified as the warriors who wore it (Jer. 46:4; 51:3).
Habergeon
Habergeonhabergeon (habʹuhr-jun), the kjv’s term for the rsv’s ‘garment’ (Exod. 28:32; 39:23), ‘javelin’ (Job 41:26), and ‘coat of mail’ (2 Chron. 26:14; Neh. 4:16). It was a short coat of mail, part of defensive armor.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
HABERGEON
HABERGEON<hab’-er-jun>, <ha-bur’-jun>, the King James Version ([תַּחֲרָא‎, tachara’]): In the Revised Version (British and American), Ex 28:32; 39:23, etc., “coat of mail”; in Job 41:26, “pointed shaft,” margin “coat of mail.”See ARMS,
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