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Cleopatra
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Ruler of the Seleucid Empire 125–120 bc, oldest daughter of Ptolemy VI (Philometor) and Cleopatra II (for the more famous Cleopatra, see this article: Cleopatra VII).Cleopatra Thea (ca. 164–120 bc) grew up in Egypt and was married to Alexander Balas in 150 bc (1 Macc 10:58; Josephus, Antiquities 13.9.1). Their marriage produced one son, Antiochus VI Dionysus. In 145 bc, her father defeated Alexander in battle; she was taken from him and given to Demetrius Nicator (1 Macc 11:12; Josephus, Antiquities 13.9.3).Demetrius was captured in 139 bc and held in Parthia for 10 years. His brother, Antiochus VII Sidetes, took possession of the Syrian throne in 137 bc and married Cleopatra. In 129 bc, Demetrius was released, Antiochus VII was killed in battle, and Demetrius reunited with Cleopatra. He died in 125 bc (Antiquities 13.9.3).Cleopatra murdered Seleucus, her eldest son by Demetrius, who had taken possession of the government in 125, and put Antiochus VIII (Grypus)—her second son by Nicator—on the throne. In 120 bc, Antiochus VIII forced Cleopatra to drink the poison that she had prepared for him.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Cleopatra III
Cleopatra Thea (Κλεοπάτρα Θεά, Kleopatra Thea, “Cleopatra the Goddess”). Ruler of the Seleucid Empire 125–120 bc, oldest daughter of Ptolemy VI (Philometor) and Cleopatra II (for the more famous Cleopatra, see this article: Cleopatra VII).Cleopatra Thea (ca. 164–120 bc) grew up in Egypt and was married
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Cleopatra (wife of Herod the Great)
CLEOPATRA (PERSON). Although borne by several minor mythological figures, the name Cleopatra (“born of a famous father”) came into prominence during the Hellenistic period mainly as a result of its close association with the royal house of Macedon. The first Cleopatra of historical note was the wife
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Cleopatra
Cleopatra klē-ə-pāʹtrə [Gk. Kleopatra—‘from a famous father’]. The name of several Egyptian queens and princesses. One, probably the wife of Ptolemy VI Philometor, is mentioned in Ad. Est. 11:1. According to Josephus (Ant. xii.9.7; xiii.3.1–3), Ptolemy and Cleopatra permitted Onias, the expatriate
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Cleopatra
CLEOPATRA Name of a queen of Egypt and her daughter mentioned in the Apocrypha and in the writings of the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus.1. Probably the wife of Ptolemy VI Philometor (ruled 181–146 bc). Dositheus, who said that he was a Levite priest and Ptolemy’s son, brought the Letter of Purim
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CLEOPATRA
CLEOPATRA<kle-o-pa’-tra> ([Κλεοπάτρα, Kleopatra], “from a famous father”): A daughter of Ptolemy VI (Philometor) and of Queen Cleopatra, who was married first to Alexander Balas 150 BC (1 Macc 10:58; Josephus, Ant, XIII, iv, 1) and was afterward taken from him by her father and given to Demetrius
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Cleopatra
Cleopatra was introduced to Julius Cæsar by Apollodōrus in a bale of rich Syrian rugs. When the bale was unbound, there was discovered the fairest and wittiest girl of all the earth, and Cæsar became her captive slave.
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Volumes I–III
CLEOPATRA
CLEOPATRA (Κλεοπάτρα). 1. A daughter of Idas and Marpessa, and wife of Meleager (Hom. Il. ix. 556), is said to have hanged herself after her husband’s death, or to have died of grief. Her real name was Alcyone. (Apollod. i. 8. § 3; Hygin. Fab. 174.)2. A Danaid, who was betrothed to Etelces or Agenor.
CLEOPATRA (Κλεοπάτρα)
CLEOPATRA (Κλεοπάτρα). 1. Niece of Attalus, one of the generals of Philip of Macedonia. Philip married her when he divorced Olympias in b. c. 337; and, after his murder, in the next year she was put to death by Olympias, being either compelled to hang herself (Justin, ix. 7) or boiled to death in a
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Cleopatra
Limestone portrait (c. 40–30 b.c.) of a woman imitating the appearance of the popular queen of Egypt, Cleopatra VII.Cleopatra klee′uh-pat′ruh (Κλεοπάτρα [fem. of Κλεόπατρος], possibly “born of a renowned father”). A common name in Macedonian and Hellenistic culture, borne by several Ptolemaic rulers
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Cleopatra
CLEOPATRA, klē-ō̇-pāʹtra (Κλεοπάτρα, Kleopátra, “from a famous father”): A daughter of Ptolemy VI (Philometor) and of Queen Cleopatra, who was married first to Alexander Balas 150 BC (1 Macc 10:58; Jos, Ant, XIII, iv, 1) and was afterward taken from him by her father and given to Demetrius Nicator
All the People in the Bible: An A–Z Guide to the Saints, Scoundrels, and Other Characters in Scripture
Cleopatra
Cleopatra [klē-uh-pat-ruh]: the name of all firstborn daughters of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt; four became queens of Egypt; all were married to their brothers, who were all named Ptolemy (1) Cleopatra II, the wife of Ptolemy VI Philometor (181–146 bce), to whom the high priest Onias fled when he
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
CLEOPATRA
CLEOPATRA klee´uh-pat´ruh [Κλεοπάτρα Kleopatra]. Several queens of the Ptolemaic and SELEUCID EMPIRE. 1. Additions to Esther 11:1 refers to a letter concerning PURIM that Dositheus took to Egypt during the reign of Ptolemy and Cleopatra, apparently referring to Cleopatra II, who ruled alongside her
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