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Cleanthes
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A Greek poet and philosopher who led the Athenian Stoic school of philosophy after the death of Zeno, the founder of Stoicism (269–232 bc). Paul’s quotation in Acts 17:28, “for we also are his offspring” (Τοῦ γὰρ καὶ γένος ἐσμέν, Tou gar kai genos esmen), is very close to a line from Cleanthes’ poem “Hymn to Zeus,” “for we are your offspring” (ἐκ σοῦ γὰρ γένος ἐσμέν, ek sou gar genos esmen). Alternatively, Paul’s quotation may be from the “Phaenomena” by Aratus, which includes the line “for we also are his offspring” (τοῦ γάρ καὶ γένος εἰμέν, tou gar kai genos eimen).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Cleanthes
Cleanthes A Greek poet and philosopher who led the Athenian Stoic school of philosophy after the death of Zeno, the founder of Stoicism (269–232 bc). Paul’s quotation in Acts 17:28, “for we also are his offspring” (Τοῦ γὰρ καὶ γένος ἐσμέν, Tou gar kai genos esmen), is very close to a line from Cleanthes’
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Cleanthes
Cleanthes. Leader of the Athenian Stoic school of philosophy from 269 to 232 bc. Cleanthes’ poem, “Hymn to Zeus,” was adapted in part by another Stoic poet, Aratus, in his own creation, “Phaenomena.” Centuries later the apostle Paul quoted the fifth line of “Phaenomena” as he spoke to a crowd on the
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Cleanthes
CLEANTHES* Leader of the Athenian Stoic school of philosophy from 269 to 232 bc. Cleanthes’ poem “Hymn to Zeus” was adapted in part by another Stoic poet, Aratus, in his own creation “Phaenomena.” Centuries later the apostle Paul quoted the fifth line of “Phaenomena” as he spoke to a crowd on the Areopagus
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Volumes I–III
CLEANTHES
CLEANTHES (Κλέανθης), a Stoic, born at Assos in Troas about b. c. 300, though the exact date is unknown. He was the son of Phanias, and entered life as a boxer, but had only four drachmas of his own when he felt himself impelled to the study of philosophy. He first placed himself under Crates, and then
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Cleanthes
Cleanthes klee-an′theez (Κλεάνθης). Son of Phanius of Assos and head of the Stoic school in Athens from 263 to 232 b.c. His Hymn to Zeus, a surviving poem, contains the words quoted by Paul in his address before the Areopagus Court (Acts 17:28). He made Stoicism more religious in its orientation by
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
CLEANTHES THE STOIC
CLEANTHES THE STOIC [Κλέανθης Kleanthēs]. Cleanthes (331–232 bce) was a student of Zeno, the founder of Stoicism, and became the head of this philosophical school in 263 bce. Although he composed over fifty books on cosmology, epistemology, and ethics, his only writing to survive is the Hymn to Zeus.