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City wall
Buildings and structures
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Battlement
Battlement. Defensive wall, with openings for shooting, on top of a fortress; by extension, a parapet or railing around any flat roof. Houses in the Near East were built with flat roofs, which were used for many different purposes. Rahab hid two Israelite spies on her roof (Jos 2:6). Saul slept on Samuel’s
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Battlement
Battlement See Fortification; Parapet (Dt. 22:8, AV); Branch (Jer. 5:10, AV).
Munition
Munition Archaic term meaning “rampart” or “defense,” used by the AV to render Heb meṣôḏâ in Isa. 29:7 (RSV “stronghold”; NEB “siege-works”), meṣāḏ in 33:16 (RSV “fortresses”; NEB “fastness”), and meṣûrâ in Nah. 2:1 (RSV “ramparts”; NEB “siege”). See Fortification; Rampart.
Rampart
Rampart [Heb. ḥēl, ḥêl] (2 S. 20:15; Ps. 48:13 [MT 14]; Lam. 2:8; Nah. 3:8); AV also TRENCH, BULWARKS; NEB also SIEGE-RAMP; [māšôr] (Zec. 9:3); AV STRONG HOLD; [mešûrâ] (Nah. 2:1); AV MUNITION; NEB BASTIONS. A steep, thick embankment raised as an outer fortification around a city.Hebrew ḥēl
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Battlement
BATTLEMENT Defensive wall, with openings for shooting, on top of a fortress; by extension, a parapet or railing around any flat roof. Houses in the Near East were built with flat roofs, which were used for many different purposes. Rahab hid two Israelite spies on her roof (Jos 2:6). Saul slept on Samuel’s
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Battlement
battlement, an ornamentation on a wall that sometimes served as a guardrail to prevent people from falling off of a roof. The nrsv uses “parapet” in Deut. 22:8; Jth. 14:1. According to Deut. 22:8 persons who owned a house without a guardrail were criminally negligent if someone fell from their roof.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Battlement
BATTLEMENT. A row of course of stones with openings on top of walls or fortifications. From these openings stones, arrows, lances were hurled on attacking soldiers (Zeph 1:16; 3:6, RSV).In Deut 22:8 a battlement or parapet was to enclose the open flat roof of a house, mainly to keep people from falling
Rampart
RAMPART. The outer wall of a fortification, or, by figure, the area between the inner and outer wall. It is a translation of the Heb. ḥēl or ḥêl which appears about ten times. It bears such translations as “trench,” “wall,” “host,” “bulwark”, and “army”. The KJV translates it as “rampart” in Lam
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Battlement
Battlement. Among the Jews a battlement was required by law to be built upon every house. It consisted of a low wall built around the roofs of the houses to prevent persons from falling off, and sometimes serving as a partition from another building. Deut. 22:8; Jer. 5:10.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Battlement
BATTLEMENT. A wall or lattice surrounding the flat roofs of an Eastern house, regarded as a protection against accidents (Deut. 22:8; “parapet,” NASB, NIV). The term may also refer to the parapet of a city wall (Jer. 5:10; but see NASB and NIV, which read “branches”). Battlement appears in the KJV, NASB,
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Battlement
Battlementa parapet wall or balustrade surrounding the flat roofs of the houses, required to be built by a special law (Deut. 22:8). In Jer. 5:10, it denotes the parapet of a city wall.
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Battlement
Battlementbattlement, often called ‘parapet,’ probably a guard rail on a roof. According to Deut. 22:8 persons who owned a house without a guard rail were criminally negligent if someone fell from their roof. An ornate example of a porch railing was found in the excavations at Ramat Rahel, probably
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Battlement
BATTLEMENT — a protective wall surrounding the flat roofs of houses in Bible times. This wall was required by law (Deut. 22:8, KJV) to prevent accidental injuries by falling. “Battlements” (Jer. 5:10, KJV) on a city wall protected soldiers from enemy attack (Song 8:9, NKJV, NRSV).
Rampart
RAMPART — a fortification consisting of an elevation or embankment, often provided with a wall to protect soldiers. A rampart was used as a protective barrier against an attacking army. The Hebrew word translated as rampart (Lam. 2:8; Nah. 3:8) means encirclement; it is variously translated by the KJV
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Battlement
Batʹtle-ment, a parapet or balustrade which surrounded the flat roofs of Oriental houses to prevent accidents. This precaution was rendered the more necessary from the circumstance that people in Eastern countries often resorted to the flat roofs of their houses for repose or amusement (Deut. 22:8).
Munition
Mu-niʹtion. This word occurs in Isa. 29:7 and Nah. 2:1; in its plural form in Isa. 33:16. It denotes a fortress on a rocky eminence, such as those to which David resorted for safety from Saul (1 Sam. 23:14).
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Rampart
RAMPART Outer ring of fortifications, usually earthworks. The underlying Hebrew term is literally “encirclement” and can be applied to moats and walls as well as earthworks (2 Sam. 20:15; Ps. 122:7; Lam. 2:8). Because Jerusalem was ringed by steep valleys, only its north side had extensive ramparts.