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Church at Sardis
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
City in Asia Minor, in the Hermus River valley; a major trade center in ancient times, and home to one of the seven churches addressed in Revelation. Sardis was located along the Pactolus River, a tributary of the Hermus River, inland from Smyrna and roughly halfway from the coast to Laodicea. It was founded as early as 1400 bc and abandoned in the 15th century ad.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Sardis
Sardis (Σάρδεις, Sardeis; modern Sart, Turkey). City in Asia Minor, in the Hermus River valley; a major trade center in ancient times, and home to one of the seven churches addressed in Revelation. Sardis was located along the Pactolus River, a tributary of the Hermus River, inland from Smyrna and roughly
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Sardis (Place)
SARDIS (PLACE) [Gk Sardeis (Σαρδεις)]. A city in Asia Minor located some 100 kms (38°28´N; 28°03´E) inland from Smyrna and Ephesus, most famous in antiquity as the capital of the Lydian empire (ca. 680–ca. 547 b.c.) and for the legendary king Croesus (ca. 560–ca. 547 b.c.). Following the Lydian empire,
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Sardis
Sardis. Important city in the Roman province of Asia, once the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia. It lay astride great highways linking it to the coastal regions to the west and to eastern Asia Minor. It was a cultural, religious, and commercial center. Under King Croesus (c. 560–547/6 bc) its
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Sardis
Sardis sarʹdis [Gk. Sardeis (Rev. 1:11; 3:1, 4)]. A city of Asia Minor located 80 km (50 mi) E of Smyrna; the capital of ancient Lydia. It was conquered by Cyrus in 546 b.c. and made the western terminus of his imperial highway from Susa; from there Cyrus II set afoot the Anabasis (401 b.c.).
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Sardis
SARDIS Important city in the Roman province of Asia, once the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia. It lay astride great highways linking it to the coastal regions to the west and to eastern Asia Minor. It was a cultural, religious, and commercial center. Under King Croesus (c. 560–547 bc), its wealth
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Sardis
Sardis (sahr´dis), the regional capital of Lydia in the province of Asia Minor and one of the seven churches addressed in Revelation (1:11; 3:1, 4). The city had been founded in 1200 bce as capital of the kingdom of Lydia, which was conquered by the Persians in the sixth century bce. After Alexander
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Sardis
SARDIS. Sardis was located about 50 miles E of Smyrna. The earliest city stood on a 1,000-foot hill five miles S of the Hermus River, the basin of which was the broadest and most fertile of the river valleys of Asia Minor. Sardis commanded the great trade and military road from the Aegean islands to
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Sardis
SARDIS. A city in the Roman province of Asia, in the W of what is now Asiatic Turkey. It was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, the greatest of the foreign powers encountered by the Greeks during their early colonization of Asia Minor. Its early prosperity, especially under Croesus, became
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Sardis
Sardis (Gk. Sárdeis)A city in Asia Minor listed among the seven churches of Rev. 1:11 (cf. 3:1–6). Founded as early as 1200 b.c., Sardis was an ancient capital of the kingdom of Lydia which was conquered by the Persians in the 6th century. Alexander’s defeat of the Persians in 334 brought independence,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Sardis
Sardis [särˊdĭs] (Gk. Sardeis). A city in western Asia Minor located in the valley of the Hermus river (modern Gediz). Sardis (“Sepharad” at Obad. 20) was the capital of the kingdom of Lydia, which existed from ca. 700 to 546 B.C., and then of the Persian satrapy of Lydia. It passed under Macedonian
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Sardis
SARDIS A city in western Asia Minor that served as the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia. The city was northeast of Ephesus on the Hermus River. Conquered by the Persians under Cyrus II in 546 b.c., it passed to the Macedonians under Alexander the Great in 334 b.c., and then to the Romans in 189
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Sardis
Sardis, city in Lydia, Asia Minor. The Christian community is one of the ‘*Seven Churches’ addressed in Rev. 3:1–6. Having a reputation for being alive, though in fact dead, its members are exhorted to repent, as Christ will return without warning. *Melito, Bp. of Sardis in the 2nd cent., also had
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