Loading…
Church at Galatia
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Territorial designation for central Asia Minor (also known as Anatolia, now modern Turkey). Roman province created by Augustus Caesar in 25 bc. Galatia covered a large territory that included ethnic Galatia as well as parts of Phrygia, Pisidia, Lyconia, and other regions in southern Asia Minor.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Galatia, Critical Issues
Galatia (Γαλατία, Galatia). Territorial designation for central Asia Minor (also known as Anatolia, now modern Turkey). Roman province created by Augustus Caesar in 25 bc. Galatia covered a large territory that included ethnic Galatia as well as parts of Phrygia, Pisidia, Lyconia, and other regions in
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Galatia (Place)
GALATIA (PLACE) [Gk Galatia (Γαλατια)]. GALATIANS. The name applied to a region of central Asia Minor (modern Turkey) which was occupied or controlled by Celtic immigrants of European origin known as Galatians. The geographical definition of this region varied widely at different periods. The Galatians
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Galatia
Galatia. Ancient kingdom resulting from migrations of Gallic people from the west and settlement on the central plain of Asia Minor. An earlier migratory movement resulted in the sack of Rome by the Gauls (or Celts) in 390 bc, but in a later attempt to overrun Greece the Gallic invaders were repulsed.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Galatia
GALATIA Ancient kingdom resulting from migrations of Gallic people from the west and settlement on the central plain of Asia Minor. An earlier migratory movement resulted in the sack of Rome by the Gauls (or Celts) in 390 bc, but in a later attempt to overrun Greece the Gallic invaders were repulsed.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Galatia
Galatia (guh-lay´shuh), a geographic term used for both a territory in north-central Asia Minor and (after the first century bce) a Roman province that included that territory plus portions of other ethnic regions to the south. The region or territory traditionally called Galatia was named for the Gauls,
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Galatia
GALATIA. In the time of the NT the term Galatia was used in two senses, ethnic and provincial. Thus there are now two theories about the location of the churches addressed in Paul’s epistle to the Galatians.1. Ethnic Galatia. This refers to that northern region of the large inner plateau of what we
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Galatia
GALATIA. 1. The ancient ethnic kingdom of Galatia located in the N of the great inner plateau of Asia Minor, including a large portion of the valley of the Halys river. A great population explosion in central Europe brought Gauls into this area during the 3rd century bc. Although never in the majority,
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Galatia
Galatia (Gk. Galatɩ́a)A region in north central Asia Minor (modern Turkey) named after Gallic/Celtic invaders. Later the name designated a Roman province.The Gauls migrated to the region in the mid-3rd century b.c.e. and made their military presence felt. King Nicomedes I of Bithynia enlisted their
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Galatia
Galatia [gə lāˊshə] (Gk. Galatia).† A region in central Asia Minor, named after the Gaulic (Celtic) population which settled there in the third century B.C.; later a Roman province. On the much-debated question of which usage of the term indicates the designation of Paul’s epistle (Gal. 1:2), see
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Galatia
GALATIA (Greek Galatia) A Roman province in central Asia Minor. It had long been the territory of a Celtic people known as the Galatians who had invaded the region in the third century b.c. Around 25 b.c., the Romans seized their kingdom and annexed it to the Roman Empire as the province of Galatia,
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Galatia
Gala´tia (land of the Galli, Gauls). The Roman province of Galatia may be roughly described as the central region of the peninsula of Asia Minor, bounded on the north by Bithynia and Paphlagonia; on the east by Pontus; on the south by Cappadocia and Lycaonia; on the west by Phrygia.—Encyc. Brit. It derived
See also