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Cherub (Person)
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The person listed in some translations of 1 Esdras 5:36; distinct from the winged angelic creatures.“Cherub” is given as the name of a person in 1 Esdras 5:36 in some translations, but this may not be the correct rendering. The deuterocanonical Greek book First Esdras largely parallels 2 Chronicles and EzraNehemiah in paraphrastic fashion, and this verse identifies a person who leads people out of Babylon after the exile. The NRSV translates the verse, “The following are those who came up from Tel-melah and Tel-harsha, under the leadership of Cherub, Addan, and Immer” (1 Esdras 5:36 NRSV). However, A New English Translation of the Septuagint/ (NETS) uses “Charaath” in place of “Cherub,” and Bird offers “Charaathalan” in English (Bird, 1 Esdras, 67). The variations in spelling are explained by the fact that major manuscripts of 1 Esdras are not in agreement. Codex Vaticanus has “Charaathalan” (χαρααθαλαν, charaathalan; Bird follows this). The Vulgate has “Carmellan.” Both of these witnesses are a conflation of “Cherub” and “Addan” (or variations of this). Rahlfs’ critical edition of the Septuagint attests “Charaath” (χαρααθ, charaath; NETS follows this), but this construction is a conjecture (Hanhardt, Göttingen Septuaginta, 98).The situation is complicated further when considering parallel verses in Ezra 2:59 and Neh 7:61. The natural reading for both results in taking “Cherub” as a geographical location, not a person. Also, they both contain the same spelling in Hebrew: keruv (כְּרוּב‎, keruv). The Septuagint has charoub (χαρουβ, charoub) and reads similarly. So the Hebrew (Masoretic Text) and the Septuagint of these parallel verses in Ezra/Nehemiah are in essential agreement on spelling and syntax.The weight of the evidence indicates that the 1 Esdras 5:36 text is unstable, and its rendering of “Cherub” as an individual is not correct. The Hebrew text of Ezra 2:59 and Neh 7:61 are better witnesses. Bird declares that this passage in 1 Esdras is problematic in general: “The text of 1 Esdras 5:7–42 is the most significant text—critical problem for the whole of 1 Esdras.… All and all from a textual vantage point, it is a very messy and complicated affair and there seems little chance of precisely reconstructing an original version of 1 Esdras here” (Bird, 1 Esdras, 198–99).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Cherub
Cherub, Returned Exile (כְּרוּב‎, keruv; χαραάθ, charaath). The person listed in some translations of 1 Esdras 5:36; distinct from the winged angelic creatures.“Cherub” is given as the name of a person in 1 Esdras 5:36 in some translations, but this may not be the correct rendering. The deuterocanonical
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Cherub (Person)
CHERUB (PERSON) [Gk Charaath (Χαρααθ)]. The leader of a group of exiles returning from two Babylonian locations, Telmelah and Telharsha, who were unable to prove their genealogies (1 Esdr 5:36). While Cherub represents a personal name in 1 Esdras, in the parallel texts (Ezra 2:59 = Neh 7:61 [LXX charoub]
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Charaathalar
Charaathalar kar-ə-ath̀ə-lär [Gk. Charaathalan] (1 Esd. 5:36, AV, NEB). Most probably a corruption of the text. The names “Cherub, Addan, and Immer” in the lists of Ezr. 2:59 and Neh. 7:61 are presented in the AV as “Charaathalar leading them, and Allar.”
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Cherub
CHERUB1. Cherub (keár×uáb) was an Israelite who returned from Captivity but was of a group who “could not prove their fathers’ houses or their descent, whether they belonged to Israel” (Ezr 2:59; Neh 7:61, RSV). It could possibly be an unknown Babylonian place name instead of a person.2. Cherub (cheár×uáb;
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Cherub
CHE´RUB (keʹrub). An Israelite of doubtful extraction, who accompanied Zerubbabel to Judea (Ezra 2:59; Neh. 7:61).
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CHARAATHALAN
CHARAATHALAN<kar-a-ath’-a-lan> ([Χαρααθαλάν, Charaathalan]; the King James Version Charaathalar (1 Esdras 5:36)): Most probably a corruption of the text. The names “Cherub, Addan, and Immer” in the lists of Ezra 2:59 and Nehemiah 7:61 are presented in the text cited as “Charaathalan leading
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Cherub
CHERUB (Cĕrʹ ŭb) Man who left Tel-melah in Babylonian exile to go to Jerusalem with Zerubbabel about 537 b.c. He could not provide a family list to prove he was an Israelite (Ezra 2:59).
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Charaathalar
Charaathalar kair′ay-ath′uh-lahr (Χαρααθαλαρ). A leader among those who returned from the exile but who could not prove their lineage (1 Esd. 5:36 KJV, following Codex Alexandrinus; Codex Vaticanus reads Charaathalan). It is likely, however, that the word should be analyzed as two names, the second of
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Charaathalan
CHARAATHALAN, kar-a-ath′a-lan (Χαρααθαλάν, Charaathalán; AV Charaathalar [1 Esd 5:36]): Most probably a corruption of the text. The names “Cherub, Addan, and Immer” in the lists of Ezr 2:59 and Neh 7:61 are presented in the text cited as “Charaathalan leading them, and Allar.”
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
CHERUB
CHERUB, CHERUBIM cher´uhb, cher´uh-bim [כְּרוּבkeruv, כְּרוּבִיםkeruvim; Χαρούβ Charoub, Χερουβίν Cheroubin]. 1. Winged beings, part animal, part human (Ezek 10:14; 41:18–19), associated with transporting Yahweh (2 Sam 22:11), the divine throne (Ezek 1; Rev 4:8–10), and in sacral garden contexts