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Charge
Accusation • Chargeable • Implead • Impute
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Charge
Charge [Heb. ṣawâ, mišmereṯ, ‘eḏûṯ (Ex. 19:23), šāmar, māšal (Gen. 24:2), śār (Gen. 47:6), ‘ûḏ (1 K. 21:10, 13), pāqaḏ, šāḇa‘ (1 S. 14:27f), mišpāṭ (1 K. 4:28), rāḏâ (1 K. 9:23), nāṯan (Job 1:22), ‘āraḵ (Ps. 50:21), šālaḥ (1 K. 14:6), rîḇ (Neh. 5:7), śîm (Job 4:18),
Implead
Implead[Gk enkaléō] (Acts 19:38, AV). Archaic term for “bring charges” (RSV).
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
charge
charge. An address delivered by a bishop, archdeacon, or other ecclesiastical person at a visitation of the clergy under his jurisdiction. Charges are also delivered to their ordinands by bishops (and, in the Presbyterian Church, by ministers) immediately before ordination. A charge is usually more of
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CHARGE; CHARGEABLE
CHARGE; CHARGEABLE<charj>, <char’-ja-b’-l> (from Latin carrus, “a wagon,” hence, “to lay or put a load on or in,” “to burden, or be a burden”):Figurative:1. of a special duty מִשְׁמֶרֶת‎ [mishmereth], “thing to be watched”), “the charge of Yahweh” (Leviticus 8:35), the injunctions given
IMPLEAD
IMPLEAD<im-pled’> (Acts 19:38 the King James Version, “Let them impIead one another”): “Implead” means “to sue at law,” hence, the Revised Version (British and American) “Let them accuse one another.” Court days are kept, let them prosecute the suit in court and not settle matters in riot.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Charge, Chargeable
CHARGE, chärj, CHARGEABLE, chär′ja-bʼl (from Lat carrus, “a wagon,” hence “to lay or put a load on or in,” “to burden, or be a burden”):Figurative: (1) of a special duty (מִשְׁמֶרֶת‎, mishmereth, “thing to be watched”), “the c. of Jeh” (Lev 8:35), the injunctions given in Ex 29; “the c. of the tabernacle” (Nu
Implead
IMPLEAD, im-plēdʹ (Acts 19:38 AV, “Let them implead one another”): “Implead” means “to sue at law,” hence RV “Let them accuse one another.” Court days are kept, let them prosecute the suit in court and not settle matters in riot. ἐγκαλεῖν, egkaleín, means “to call in,” “to call to account.”
Key passages
Ac 24:1

And after five days the high priest Ananias came down with some elders and an attorney, a certain Tertullus, all of whom brought charges against Paul to the governor.

Ac 24:19–20

But there are some Jews from Asia who ought to be present before you and bring charges against me, if they have anything against me, or these men themselves should say what crime they found when I stood before the Sanhedrin,

Ac 25:1–7

Now when Festus set foot in the province, after three days he went up to Jerusalem from Caesarea. And the chief priests and the most prominent men of the Jews brought charges against Paul to him, and were urging him, asking for a favor against him, that he summon him to …

Ac 25:14–19

And while they were staying there many days, Festus laid out the case against Paul to the king, saying, “There is a certain man left behind by Felix as a prisoner, concerning whom when I was in Jerusalem the chief priests and the elders of the Jews presented evidence, asking for a sentence of …

Ac 26:2

“Concerning all the things of which I am accused by the Jews, King Agrippa, I consider myself fortunate that before you I am about to defend myself today,

See also
Ac 25:27; Ac 28:18–19;