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Catapult
Warfare
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Engines of War
Engines of War. Mechanical devices used in war, such as battering rams.See Arms and Warfare.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Engines of War
engines of war, the machinery for warfare, which could be used for either offensive or defensive purposes. Offensively, battering rams were used quite effectively by armies campaigning in the Near East. Graphic examples of fortified battering rams are given in the Assyrian king Sennacherib’s palace reliefs
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Catapult
CATAPULT. An ancient military machine used for discharging darts, stones, or other objects. The motive power was obtained by a strong lever working on an axis, which was tightly strained with twisted ropes and suddenly released. Although this machine is not mentioned specifically in the Bible, it was
Engine
ENGINE. Translation of two words in Heb.: (1) ḥishshbōnôt (2 Chr 26:15), devices of war for hurling stones and arrows, i.e., catapults (q.v.); (2) mḥɩ̂qbōl (Ezk 26:9), literally, “the smiting of an attacking engine,” i.e., the blows of a battering ram (cf. RSV). See Armor.
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Engine
Engine, a term applied exclusively to military affairs in the Bible. The engines to which the term is applied in 2 Chron. 26:15 were designed to propel various missiles from the walls of a besieged town. One, with which the Hebrews were acquainted, was the battering-ram, described in Ezek. 26:9, and
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Engine
ENGINE. A term applied in Scripture exclusively to military affairs. See Armor.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Engines
Engines(1.) Heb. hishalon i.e., “invention” (as in Eccl. 7:29) contrivances indicating ingenuity. In 2 Chr. 26:15 it refers to inventions for the purpose of propelling missiles from the walls of a town, such as stones (the Roman balista) and arrows (the catapulta).(2.) Heb. mechi kobollo, i.e., the
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Engines of War
Engines of Warengines of war, the machinery for warfare, which could be used for either offensive or defensive purposes. Offensively, battering rams were used quite effectively by armies campaigning in Palestine. Graphic examples of fortified battering rams are given in the Assyrian king Sennacherib’s
Compton’s Encyclopedia
catapult
catapultIn the Roman-era catapult, an arm bearing a stone was winched down, building up torsion in a bundle …Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.A catapult is a simple mechanism used to forcefully propel stones, spears, or other projectiles. It has been in use mainly as a military weapon since ancient
diesel engine
diesel engineThe typical sequence of cycle events involves a single intake valve, fuel-injection nozzle, and …Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.Of all internal-combustion engines, the diesel engine is the most efficient—that is, it can extract the greatest amount of mechanical energy from a given
motor and engine
motor and engineSelf-contained devices that convert electrical, chemical, or nuclear energy into mechanical energy are called motors and engines. In many areas of the world they have replaced human and animal power by providing energy for transportation and for driving all kinds of machines. The chemical
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Engines
Enʹgines, warlike instruments for throwing stones, battering down walls, etc. (2 Chron. 26:15; Ezek. 26:9).
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Engine
engine. This English term is used by the KJV twice in the OT (2 Chr. 26:15; Ezek. 26:9). According to the first passage, King Uzziah made engines (Heb. ḥiššābôn H3115, “device, invention”; NIV and NRSV, “machines”) “for use on the towers and on the corner defenses to shoot arrows and hurl large
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
MACHINES OF WAR
MACHINES OF WAR [חִשְּׁבֹןkhishevon; μηχανή mēchanē]. “Machines of war” refers to a class of mechanically sophisticated artillery utilized in siege warfare to deliver arms and weaponry with increased force, including the BATTERING RAM and catapult. Uzziah is said to have “set up machines, invented
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