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Catacombs
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Tunnels and vaults intended for the burial of the dead. The catacombs under the city of Rome, unmentioned in the Bible, became famous for providing refuge for early Christians. Over 300 miles of underground passages extend 25 to 65 feet below the ground, outside the city gates. For more details, see this article: Christian Monuments at Rome.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Catacombs
Catacombs Tunnels and vaults intended for the burial of the dead. The catacombs under the city of Rome, unmentioned in the Bible, became famous for providing refuge for early Christians. Over 300 miles of underground passages extend 25 to 65 feet below the ground, outside the city gates. For more details,
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
catacombs
catacombs. This term for subterranean burial-places is prob. derived from the Gk. κατὰ κύμβας (‘at the hollows’). Applied to the Christian cemetery of St *Sebastian by the *Chronographer of 354, it was being used of similar communal burial-places c. 800.Subterranean burial was common in the ancient
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Catacombs
CATACOMBS — deep, underground tunnels and vaults intended, for the most part, for the burial of the dead. The famous catacombs of Rome, extending for hundreds of miles, were used as places of refuge by the early Christians, who sought to escape persecution from the Roman Empire. They also conducted religious
A Catholic Dictionary
Catacombs
catacombs. A sketch of the present state of knowledge about the Roman catacombs, considering the high religious interest of the subject, may fairly be expected in a work like the present. We shall briefly describe their position, explain their origin, and trace their history; then, after describing the
Compton’s Encyclopedia
catacomb
catacombThe great plain on which the city of Rome is located has three volcanic layers, one of which—granular tufa—is relatively easy to cut. Out of this rock were cut the underground passageways and chambers known as the catacombs. These were primarily subterranean burial sites, used by Jews and by
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Catacomb
Catacomb. A subterranean place for the burial of the dead. The Persians have a city they call Comb or Coom, full of mausoleums and the sepulchres of the Persian saints. (Greek, kata-kumbē, a hollow place underground.) (See Koom.)“The most awful idea connected with the catacombs is their interminable
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Catacombs
Catacombs.—Subterraneous chambers and passages, formed generally in rock which is soft and easily excavated, such as tufa. Catacombs are to be found in almost every country where such stone exists, and in most cases, probably, originated in mere quarries, which afterwards were used either as places of
Pocket Dictionary of Liturgy & Worship
Catacombs, Christian Roman
catacombs, Christian Roman. From the Latin ad Catacumbas (“near the hollow”), the traditional name for the funerary area beneath Basilica S. Sebastiano, now applied to all the ancient underground cemeteries found outside the periphery of ancient Rome. The catacombs were, generally speaking, neither places
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Catacombs
Egyptian relief in the catacombs of Alexandria, Egypt, depicting a winged figure and the bull-god Apis.catacombs. Subterranean burial places used by the early church. The term originally designated a locality near the church of St. Sebastian on the Appian Way, 3 mi. S of Rome. The name (of uncertain
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Catacombs
CatacombsIn 1977 the Pontificio Commissione di Archeologia Sacra (PCAS) undertook to catalogue systematically all the archaeological material retrieved in the Roman catacombs (see Fasola, 1982). The maintenance and preservation of much of this heritage is at risk, esp. the fresco → paintings. Altogether
Catacomb: Early Christian (Rome)
Catacomb: Early Christian (Rome)Underground → burial complex, typically consisting of at least four structural features: 1. stairs leading from above ground to subterranean spaces 2. underground corridors, sometimes at more than one level 3. subterranean rooms of varying sizes 4. vertical shafts,
Catacomb: Jewish
Catacomb: Jewish(→ Catacomb: Early Christian). Subterranean c. complexes at three places contain Jewish interments: Rome and Venosa in Italy, and Beth Sheʿarim in Galilee, Israel. All other subterranean cemeteries with Jewish interments fall under the → hypogeum rubric; there are multiple examples in
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