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Cassia
Cinnamon • Cinnamon-Tree and Cassia-Tree
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Cassia
Cassia. Type of tree that produces a spice resembling cinnamon (Ex 30:24; Ez 27:19).See Plants.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Cassia
1. [Heb. qiddâ; Gk. íris] (Ex. 30:24; Ezk. 27:19). An ingredient of the holy anointing oil along with myrrh, cinnamon, calamus, and olive oil. According to Ezk. 27:19 it was one of the commodities Damascus traded with Tyre. Cassia comprised the fragrant inner bark of the Cinnamomum cassia Blume, a
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Cassia
CASSIA Type of tree that produces a spice resembling cinnamon (Ex 30:24; Ez 27:19). See Plants.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Cassia
cassia (kash´uh; Cinnamomum cassia), a tree native to India and the Far East whose bark is easily peeled into long hollow rolls. The bark, buds, leaves, and twigs of the cassia tree, having a cinnamon smell, were imported for use in making spices, perfumes, and oils (Ezek. 27:19; Exod. 30:24; Ps. 45:8).
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Cassia
CassiaA tree (Cinnamomum cassia Blume) whose bark peels off and produces a fragrant oil when distilled (Ps. 45:8 [MT 9]). Similar to cinnamon, it is often used as a less precious substitute for that spice. Cassia (Heb. qiddâ, qĕṣɩ̂ʿâ) is native to the Far East, and its products were brought to the
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Cassia
Cassia. Ex. 30:24; Ezek. 27:19. The cassia bark of commerce is yielded by various kinds of Cinnamomum, which grow in different parts of India. The Hebrew word in Ps. 45:8 is generally supposed to be another term for cassia.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Cassia
Cassia(1.) Hebrew kiddah’, i.e., “split.” One of the principal spices of the holy anointing oil (Ex. 30:24), and an article of commerce (Ezek. 27:19). It is the inner bark of a tree resembling the cinnamon (q.v.), the Cinnamomum cassia of botanists, and was probably imported from India.(2.) Hebrew
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Cassia
Cassiacassia (Cinnamomum cassia), a tree native to India and the Far East, whose bark is easily peeled into long hollow rolls. The bark, buds, leaves, and twigs of the cassia tree, having a cinnamon smell, were imported for use in making spices, perfumes, and oils (Ezek. 27:19; Exod. 30:24; Ps. 45:8).
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CASSIA
CASSIA<kash’-a>: Two Hebrew words,1. קִדּה‎ [qiddah], which is mentioned, along with myrrh, cinnamon, calamus and olive oil, as one of the ingredients of the “holy anointing oil” (Exodus 30:24); it was, too, one of the wares in which Vedan and Javan traded with Tyre (Ezekiel 27:19); it is identified
Compton’s Encyclopedia
cassia
cassiagenus of pea, or pulse, family; many species, most of them native to warm regions, include trees, shrubs, and wildflowers such as senna; most of them with showy clusters of golden or orange-yellow blossoms resembling the sweet pea in form, and with long beanlike seedpods and compound leaves of
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Cassia
Casʹsia, an aromatic but unknown shrub or tree whose bark or root formed an ingredient in costly unguents (Ex. 30:24). It is supposed to be the same as the koost of the Arabs, the Costus Arabicus, of the ginger tribe.
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