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Carmel
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Carmel
Carmel (כַּרְמֶל‎, karmel). A Judaean city (modern-day Khirbet el-Kirmil) located approximately eight miles south of Hebron; not to be confused with Mount Carmel, a mountain range in northern Israel.
Racal
Racal (רָכָל‎, rakhal; כַּרְמֶל‎, karmel). A city to which David distributed spoils from his counterattack against the Amalekites after the Amalekites raided Ziklag (1 Sam 30:26–31).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Carmel (Place)
CARMEL (PLACE) [Heb karmel (כַּרְמֶל)]. A town in the Judean wilderness (Josh 15:55) located approximately eight miles southeast of Hebron (M.R. 162092). Carmel was the site of a monument built by Saul (1 Sam 15:12); the location of the sheepshearing business of Nabal (1 Samuel 25); and the home of Abigail
Racal (Place)
RACAL (PLACE) [Heb rākāl (רָכָל)]. One of the cities listed as places to which David sent spoil following the destruction of the band of Amalekites who had destroyed Ziklag (1 Sam 30:29). The location of Racal is unknown (IDB 4:4). The LXX, however, has “Carmel” at this point (McCarter 1 Samuel AB,
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Carmel
Carmel. 1. Mountainous ridge extending about 20 miles along the Mediterranean Sea and jutting southeast into the Jezreel Valley. Its greatest width at the southeast is 13 miles, its highest point 1,742 feet. Geologically the ridge is of the same Cenomanian limestone formation as the central range of
Racal
Racal. One of the towns in southern Judah in which David distributed the spoils taken from the defeated Amalekites (1 Sm 30:29, kjv Rachal). The city is named Carmel in the Septuagint.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Carmel
Carmel kär̀məl [Heb. hakkarmel—‘fruit garden’; Gk. (Josephus) ho Karmēlos, Karmēlion óros].
Carmel (Place)
2. A town in Judah (Josh. 15:55) in the uplands near Hebron named in association with Maon and Ziph. It is identified with the present-day Kermel, about 8 mi (13 km) SSE of Hebron; and ruins at the site include a tower dating from the 12th cent. a.d. At Carmel Saul erected a monument after defeating
Racal
Racal rāʹkal, räʹkäl [Heb. rāḵāl; LXX B Karmēlos, A Rhachēl; Eusebius (Onom 146.2) Rhachel]; AV, NEB, RACHAL. According to the MT, one of the towns in southern Judah to which David sent booty taken from the Amalekites (1 S. 30:29). Most scholars agree that the LXX B reading, “Carmel,” is to be preferred
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Carmel
CARMEL1. Mountainous ridge extending about 20 miles (32.2 kilometers) along the Mediterranean Sea and jutting southeastward into the Jezreel Valley. Its greatest width at the southeast is 13 miles (20.9 kilometers); its highest point, 1,742 feet (530.7 meters). Geologically, the ridge is of the same
Racal
RACAL One of the towns in southern Judah in which David distributed the spoils taken from the defeated Amalekites (1 Sm 30:29). The city is named Carmel in the Septuagint.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Carmel
Carmel (kahr´muhl; Heb., “garden,” “orchard”).1 A range of fertile, forested hills (Amos 1:2; Isa. 33:9; Nah. 1:4) about fifteen miles long on the western border of the land allotted to the tribe of Asher (Josh. 19:26). It extends from the Samaritan hill country west to the Mediterranean and south to
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Carmel
Mount Carmel with Haifa at its foot. IISCARMEL1. A mountain promontory 556 feet high situated between the plain of Esdraelon and the Mediterranean Sea (Jer 46:18). It was so called because of its thickly wooded aspect, which was even more striking in ancient times than it is today (Isa 33:9; Amos
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Carmel
CARMEL (Heb. karmel, ‘garden-land’, ‘fruitful land’). The word is used as a common noun in Hebrew with this meaning; examples are Is. 16:10; Je. 4:26; 2 Ki. 19:23; 2 Ch. 26:10. It can even be used of fresh ears of grain, as in Lv. 2:14; 23:14. Thus, the limestone Carmel hills probably got their name
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Carmel
Carmel (Heb. karmel)1. A wooded mountain range along the northern coast of Israel that runs northwest from the plain of Esdraelon to the Mediterranean coast near the modern city of Haifa, where its headland (Mt. Carmel or Jebel Kurmul) forms the harbor and the bay of Acre. The range separates the coastal
Racal
Racal (Heb. rāḵāl)A place in Judah to which David sent a portion of the spoil taken in battle against the Amalekite soldiers who had destroyed Ziklag (1 Sam. 20:29). The LXX reading “Carmel” (2) is probably correct.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Racal
Racal [rāˊkăl] (Heb. rāḵāl “market”). A place in Judah to which David sent a portion of the spoil taken in a battle against Amalekite raiders (1 Sam. 30:29; KJV “Rachel”). The LXX reading “Carmel” is probably correct (see Carmel 1).
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Carmel
CARMEL A town in the hills of Judah (Josh. 15:55) where Saul set up a monument after his victory over Amalek (1 Sam. 15:12). Nabal was shearing his sheep in Carmel when David’s messengers arrived and his wife Abigail, a native of the town, went out from there to appease David (1 Sam. 25:2 ff.; 27:3).
Carmel (Place)
CARMEL (MOUNT) A mountain range; the northwestern continuation of the hills of Samaria, rising to 1,650 feet above sea level. The Carmel formed the southern limit of the territory of Asher (Josh. 19:26) and the southwestern border of the Valley of Esdraelon (Jezreel) (1 Kgs. 18:42–6). The River Kishon
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Carmel
CARMEL כרמלI. Carmel (Jebel Kurmul) is a promontory on the Mediterranean Coast of Israel near Haifa which since ancient times was considered as ‘holy’. A deity was worshipped there whose name occurs outside the Bible as “god of the Carmel”. In the OT Mount Carmel is known especially as scene of a trial
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