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Carcass
Carcase
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Carcass
Carcass The term is used of the dead body of a beast, and sometimes in a contemptuous way of the dead body of a human being. (1) It occurs in Gen. 15:11 as a translation of Heb. peg̱er, which is translated “dead body” in Nu. 14:29; 1 S. 17:46; Isa. 66:24; Ezk. 6:5; 43:7, 9, and “corpse” in Nah. 3:3.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Carcase
CARCASE. The spelling is now carcass. It refers to the dead body of a beast (Jdg 14:8), or sometimes in a contemptuous way to the dead body of a human being (Josh 8:29). The use of the word as applied to a living body is not found in either the OT or NT.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Carcass
Carcass. The remains of an animal that has died a natural death. Heb. neḇēlâ is derived from the stem nbl “fall off, wither” (as leaves and flowers). The term is used in reference to the human corpse and to the dead body or carcass of an animal (Lev. 5:2; 11:8, 11, 24–25, 35ff.; Deut. 14:8; cf.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Carcass
CARCASS. The dead body of man or beast. According to the Mosaic law: (1) The dead body of a human being rendered unclean the tent (or house) in which the man had died, with any open vessels therein, for seven days. It was no less defiling to touch the dead. (2) Contact with the carcass of any animal
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Carcase
Carcasecontact with a, made an Israelite ceremonially unclean, and made whatever he touched also unclean, according to the Mosaic law (Hag. 2:13; comp. Num. 19:16, 22; Lev. 11:39).
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Carcass
CARCASS — the dead body of an animal or a human being (Gen. 15:11; 1 Kin. 13:22), in the latter case usually called a corpse. The Book of Leviticus lists those animals that are forbidden as food and whose carcasses one must not touch, lest one become unclean (Lev. 11:4–40). A person was also rendered
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CARCASS; CARCASE
CARCASS; CARCASE<kar’-kas>: The dead body of a beast; used sometimes in a contemptuous way of the dead body of a human being. The use of the word as applied to a living body is not found in either Old Testament or New Testament.1. It occurs as a translation of the Hebrew פֶּגר‎ [pegher], in Genesis
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Carcass
carcass. The dead body of either a person or an animal. This term is used more than fifty times in the KJV (with the spelling “carcase”). When used with reference to a human being, the term in modern English has a derogatory or disdainful connotation. For that reason it occurs less frequently in modern
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Carcass, Carcase
CARCASS, CARCASE, kär′kas: The dead body of a beast; used sometimes in a contemptuous way of the dead body of a human being. The use of the word as applied to a living body is not found in either OT or NT. (1) It occurs as a tr of the Heb פֶּגֶר‎, pegher, in Gen 15:11; this Heb word is also trd “dead