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Carbuncle
Substances
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Carbuncle
Carbuncle. Red or fiery colored stone such as a garnet or ruby; mentioned as one of the gems in the high priest’s breastplate (Ex 28:17).See Minerals, Metals, and Precious Stones.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Carbuncle
CARBUNCLE* Red or fiery colored stone such as a garnet or ruby; mentioned as one of the gems in the high priest’s breastplate (Ex 28:17). See Stones, Precious.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Carbuncle
carbuncle, a decorative stone, possibly red, green, or blue, used in liturgical items. In the three places that the term is used in the kjv and rsv (Exod. 28:17; 29:10; Ezek. 28:13), it is translated “emerald” in the nrsv and “beryl” in the niv. The plural is simply translated “jewels” by both the nrsv
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Carbuncle
CarbuncleA deep red stone found on the Sinai Peninsula. The NAB reads “carbuncle” for Heb. ʾeqdaḥ, the material of idealized Zion’s gates (Isa. 54:12). Other translations include “crystal,” “beryl,” “firestone,” and “red granite.” Some previous translations used “carbuncle” for bāreqeṯ, an engraved
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Carbuncle
Carbuncle. Any of several precious red stones. At Exod. 28:17; 39:10 it is listed as the third stone in the first row of precious stones on the breastpiece worn by the high priest (Heb. bāreqeṯ “dark-green beryl”; KoB, p. 156; NIV “beryl”). According to the LXX (Gk. smarágdos) it was an
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Carbuncle
Carbuncle. This word represents two Hebrew words. The first may be a general term to denote any bright, sparkling gem, Isa. 54:12; the second, Ex. 28:17; 39:10; Ezek. 28:13, is supposed to be the smaragdus or emerald.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Carbuncle
Carbuncle(Ex. 28:17; 39:10; Ezek. 28:13). Heb. barkath; LXX. smaragdos; Vulgate, smaragdus; Revised Version, marg., “emerald.” The Hebrew word is from a root meaning “to glitter,” “lighten,” “flash.” When held up to the sun, this gem shines like a burning coal, a dark-red glowing coal, and hence is
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Carbuncle
Carʹbun-cle, a precious stone. Two different words in Hebrew are thus rendered in our English Version, but neither gives us such exact information in respect to the character of the stone as enables us to identify it with the carbuncle known to us. The first word is a general term to denote any bright,
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Carbuncle
CARBUNCLE Precious stone used in the priest’s breastpiece (Exod. 28:17 KJV) and part of the king of Tyre’s apparel in the garden of Eden according to Ezekiel’s ironic description (Ezek. 28:13). Equation with a stone used today is difficult if not impossible. NASB and NRSV read “emerald”; NIV, “beryl.”
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Carbuncle
carbuncle. This term is used by the KJV and other versions to render the Hebrew word bāreqet H1403, which is better translated beryl or emerald (Exod. 28:17; 39:20; Ezek. 28:13). The carbuncles of the ancients were probably mainly garnets (Isa. 54:12 NEB) and, to a lesser extent, rubies. The term is
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Carbuncle
CarbuncleA Latin compound that joins carbo (coal or charcoal: red-hot) with the adjectival suffix (un) culus (signaling a diminutive), thus “a little piece of red-hot coal/charcoal.” “Carbunculus” has variant meanings in Latin lexicology, but one of the most persistent, both in pagan and in Christian