Loading…
Canon of the Bible
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Canon of the Bible, Traditions of. An overview of the books considered canonical and included in the Bibles of different traditions.Jews and Christians throughout the centuries have produced Bibles with varied content and organization. Before the Protestant Reformation, Christian versions of the Old Testament generally included a variety of books that were not included in Jewish Bibles. Protestant Reformers like Martin Luther doubted the canonicity of these books, now known by Protestants as the Apocrypha, but when Luther prepared his translation of the Bible into German, he did not remove the Apocrypha; he simply moved those books to an appendix. This tradition continues in many European Bibles.The English were the first group of people to remove the Apocrypha altogether. In 1599, an edition of the Geneva Bible was published without the Apocrypha. In 1615, during the reign of King James the First, George Abbot, the Archbishop of Canterbury, declared the penalty for printing a Bible without the Apocrypha to be a year in prison. Over the next three centuries the growing influence of Puritans and Presbyterians over the populace, the government, and the British and Foreign Bible Society led to a strong tradition of printing Bibles containing only 66 books.The situation today reflects this bifurcation: The Bibles used by many European Protestants, as well as the Anglican church, still include the Apocrypha as a separate section. Most other English-speaking Protestant churches have Bibles without the Apocrypha.Non-Protestant groups of Christians continue to include books in their Old Testaments that are outside the Jewish canon and classified by Protestants as Apocrypha; the details of which books are included vary from tradition to tradition.Christian canons of the New Testament show less variation than canons of the Old Testament, but Syriac and Ethiopian traditions show some variation relative to the Protestant, Roman Catholic, and Eastern Orthodox canon.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Canon of the Bible, Traditions of the
Canon of the Bible, Traditions of the Canon of the Bible, Traditions of. An overview of the books considered canonical and included in the Bibles of different traditions.Jews and Christians throughout the centuries have produced Bibles with varied content and organization. Before the Protestant Reformation,
Canon, Overview of the
Canon, Overview of the The Christian canon is the official list of texts determined to be both inspired by God and authoritative for the church. The canon lists vary slightly within various streams of Christianity. These sacred collections were formed in an organic, communal process called canonization
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Bible, Canon of the
Bible, Canon of the. Those books in the Jewish and Christian Bible considered to be Scripture and therefore authoritative in matters of faith and doctrine. The term translates both a Greek and a Hebrew word that mean “a rule,” or “measuring rod.” It is a list to which other books are compared and by
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Bible, Canon of the
BIBLE*, CANON OF THE Those books in the Jewish and Christian Bible considered to be Scripture and therefore authoritative in matters of faith and doctrine. The term translates both a Greek and a Hebrew word that mean “a rule,” or “measuring rod.” It is a list to which other books are compared and by
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Canon of the Bible
CANON OF THE BIBLE (Greek kanōn, “rule” or “standard,” from the Hebrew qāneh, “reed”) The authentic list of inspired writings that are recognized and received by the Church and that make up the Old and New Testaments.I. The Idea of a CanonA. The Origin of the IdeaB. The Canon and the LiturgyII. The
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
canon of Scripture
canon of Scripture (from Gk. κανών, ‘measuring rod’, ‘rule’). The term, used also in a larger sense for a list or catalogue, gradually acquired a technical meaning for the Books which were officially received as containing the rule of the Christian faith. In this sense the words ‘canon’ and ‘canonical’,
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Canon of Scripture the
Canon of Scripture, The, may be generally described as the “collection of books which form the original and authoritative written rule of the faith and practice of the Christian Church,” i.e., the Old and New Testaments. The word canon, in classical Greek, is properly a straight rod, “a rule” in the
Encyclopedia of the Reformed Faith
Canon of Scripture
Canon of ScriptureWith reference to the Bible, “canon” means the list or collection of books that were received as divinely inspired and therefore serve as the rule or standard for belief and practice, Though recognition of the canon of the OT and the NT was of momentous consequences, history is silent
Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics
Bible, Canonicity Of
Bible, Canonicity of. Canonicity (Fr. canon, rule or norm) refers to the normative or authoritative books inspired by God for inclusion in Holy Scripture. Canonicity is determined by God (see Bible, Evidence for). It is not the antiquity, authenticity, or religious community that makes a book canonical
A Catholic Dictionary
Canon of the Scripture
canon of the scripture. The word canon (κανών) signifies a rod, and then specially a measuring-rule. It was used by a natural metaphor for a rule in ethics, art, &c., and by the Alexandrian writers it was applied to the standard or classical authors who furnished the model or rule of correct writing.
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Canon of the Scriptures
Canon of the Scriptures.—The word canon, which is of Greek origin, means a rod or stick, with which lines were drawn, and quantities measured. The name of this instrument denoted the standard by which the quality of things was fixed, and in the middle of the fourteenth century it was employed to distinguish
Pocket Dictionary of Church History: Over 300 Terms Clearly and Concisely Defined
Canon of Holy Scripture
canon of Holy Scripture. A list of authoritative books of the Bible gradually defined by the early church. The word canon comes from a Greek word meaning “measuring rod.” First used for the biblical books by the Alexandrian scholar *Origen in the third century, the idea of an official canon was made
Pocket Dictionary of the Reformed Tradition
Canon, Biblical
canon, biblical. Meaning biblical standard or rule, this is the list of books the church recognizes to be the written *Word of God. Until the *Council of Trent, the list was divided into those books universally accepted by the *tradition and those, including the Old Testament Apocrypha and several minor
See also
Topics & Themes