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Camel
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A large beast of burden. Ancient Near Eastern zoology includes a number of large animals, such as horses, mules, donkeys, and camels (Exod 9:3; Ezra 2:67). Camels were Israel’s largest creature. These “ships of the desert” could travel long distances with heavy loads (King and Stager, Israel, 118, 186–87).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Camel
Camel (גָּמָל‎, gamal; κάμηλος, kamēlos). A large beast of burden. Ancient Near Eastern zoology includes a number of large animals, such as horses, mules, donkeys, and camels (Exod 9:3; Ezra 2:67). Camels were Israel’s largest creature. These “ships of the desert” could travel long distances with heavy
Dromedary
Dromedary (כִּרְכָּר֗וֹת‎, kirkaroth). The swift, one-humped, thoroughbred Arabian camel used for riding and racing (Isa 66:20). The majority of biblical references to the camel use a different word for the animal (גָּמָל‎, gamal). The Hebrew term כִּרְכָּר֗וֹת‎ (kirkaroth) only appears in Isa 66:20 and
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Camel
CAMEL. From the order Artiodactyla and the family Camelidae (even-toed ungulates). In the family there are six living species with two in the Old World: the dromedary (or one-humped camel: C. dromedarius) and the bactrian (or two-humped camel: C. bactrianus). (For distinctive zoological characteristics,
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Camel
Camel. Domestic animal used as a means of travel and for carrying goods in the Near East.See Animals.
Dromedary
Dromedary. Swift-footed camel of the Arabian species.See Animals (Camel).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Camel
Camel [Heb. gāmāl]; AV also DROMEDARY (Jer. 2:23); NEB also SHE-CAMEL (Jer. 2:23); [beḵer] (“young camels,” Isa. 60:6); AV, NEB, DROMEDARIES; [Gk. kámēlos]. There are two species of camel, the Arabic or one-humped camel or dromedary, Camelus dromedarius, and the Bactrian or two-humped camel, Camelus
Camel’s Hair
Camel’s Hair [Gk. tríches kamḗlou]. Hair from the back and hump of the camel was woven into a harsh material, and a softer cloth was produced from the finer hair taken from underneath the animal. The natural variations in the color of the hair could be woven into a pattern.The garment worn by John
Dromedary
Dromedary [Heb. kirkārâ] (Isa. 66:20); AV SWIFT BEAST. The Hebrew term designates a “fast-running female camel” (CHAL, p. 164). See Camel.
Swift Beasts
Swift Beasts AV term for RSV, NEB Dromedary (Isa. 66:20) and “steeds” (Mic. 1:13;. see Horse).
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Camel
CAMEL Domestic animal used as a means of travel and for carrying goods in the Near East. See Animals.
Dromedary
DROMEDARY* Swift-footed camel of the Arabian species. See Animals (Camel).
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Camel
camel (Heb. gamal). The camel is frequently mentioned in the Bible as a beast of burden and as a riding animal, often in association with nomadic tribes (e.g., Gen. 37:25; Judg. 7:12; 1 Kings 10:1–2). There are two types of domesticated camels: the one-humped dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and the two-humped
Camel’s Hair
camel’s hair, a type of material for clothing mentioned only in Matt. 3:4 and Mark 1:6, which indicate that John the Baptist wore clothing of camel’s hair. Because these passages refer to John’s austere lifestyle, scholars generally assume that the reference is not to a cloak of camel’s hair (though
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Camel's Hair
CAMEL’S HAIR. In Mt 3:4 and Mk 1:6 the outer garment of John the Baptist is said to have been of camel’s hair. It is rather long and wolly in texture, and when woven makes a course, durable textile which both ancient and modern Bedouins have found suitable for clothing or tent coverings. Toward the spring
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Camel
CAMEL (Heb. gāmāl; Gk. kamēlos). A desert quadruped, famous for its ability to cross desert regions through being able to carry within itself several days’ water-supply. The Heb. term (like the popular use of the word ‘camel’ in English) does not distinguish between the two characteristic kinds of
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Camel
CamelEither of two species of camel (Heb. gāmāl; Gk. kámēlos): the dromedary, one-hump camel, native to Arabia; and the Bactrian, two-hump camel, named for its origin in central Asia. The dromedary is the one normally referred to in Scripture, though Isa. 21:7 may refer to the Bactrian camel, which
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Camel
Camel. Either of two large species of ruminant mammals used for carrying burdens and for transportation.
Dromedary
Dromedary (Heb. kirkārâ). A one-humped Arabian riding camel (Camelus dromedarius), named among the animals carrying the returned Israelites to Mt. Zion (Isa. 66:20; KJV “swift beast”; NIV “camels”). The Hebrew name (*kirkeret) may be related etymologically to the verb krr “dance,” a reference
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Camel
CAMEL Frequently mentioned in the Old Testament, chiefly as a beast of burden (2 Kgs 8:9) but also as a symbol of prosperity and wealth (Gen 12:16; 24; 31:17; Exod 9:3; 1 Kgs 10:2). It is not certain when the camel was first domesticated in the Near East. Camels appear in the Bible as early as the patriarchal
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Camel
Camel. The species of camel which was in common use among the Jews and the heathen nations of Palestine was the Arabian or one-humped camel, Camelus arabicus. The dromedary is a swifter animal than the baggage-camel, and is used chiefly for riding purposes; it is merely a finer breed than the other.