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Cairo Genizah
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The name given to a large collection of manuscript fragments that were recovered in the 1890s from a storeroom for unused manuscripts (called a “genizah”) in the Ben Ezra Synagogue in Cairo, Egypt. The documents date from the late ninth century ad into the 19th century.Important documents found there include fragments of Old Testament books, Targum fragments, Hebrew portions of the book of Sirach, palimpsests of New Testament books (where the original text had been rubbed out and written over), and two copies of the Damascus Document, which was also later found among the Dead Sea Scrolls.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Cairo Genizah
Cairo Genizah The name given to a large collection of manuscript fragments that were recovered in the 1890s from a storeroom for unused manuscripts (called a “genizah”) in the Ben Ezra Synagogue in Cairo, Egypt. The documents date from the late ninth century ad into the 19th century.Important documents
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Genizah
Genizah (Heb. gĕnɩ̂zâ)The chamber of a synagogue which stores wornout copies of the Torah and other sacred writings no longer fit for use in worship as well as heretical works (from Heb. gānaz, “cover, hide”). Such a chamber, dating to 886 c.e., was discovered at Cairo in 1896. In addition to important
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Genizah
Genizah [gə nēˊzə] (Heb. geenîzâ, from gānaz “cover, hide”).* The chamber of a synagogue which stores wornout copies of the Torah and other sacred writings no longer fit for use in worship as well as heretical works. Such a chamber, dating to A.D. 886, was discovered at Cairo in 1896; in addition
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Genizah
genizah guh-nee’zuh, guh-neet’suh (postbiblical Heb. גְּנִיזָה, “removal, storehouse”; cf. biblical Heb. גֶּנֶזH1709, “treasury”). Also geniza. A place in a synagogue set aside for the storage of unwanted written and printed material of a religious nature. These items are called Shemot (“Names”) because
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Cairo
Cairo(al-Qāhira). Capital of modern Egypt, founded in 969 by the Fatimids; C. has no early Christian roots; however, its location at the juncture of Lower and Upper Egypt meant that it was a place of great strategic importance, including in late antiquity (see map 19, B1). An old caravan route from
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
GENIZAH
GENIZAH guh-neet´suh. A repository for worn-out sacred texts that, according to rabbinic law, should be hidden away or buried rather than destroyed. The root gnz (גנז), “to hide, store,” is probably of Semitic origin, but seems to have entered Hebrew from Persian (e.g., Esth 3:9 ginze hammelekh [גִּנִּזֵי