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Cage
Occupational Objects
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Cage
Cage [Heb. sûg̱ar] (Ezk. 19:9); AV WARD. The context indicates that the “cage” of Ezk. 19:9 was a portable enclosure for holding a captive en route to a stationary prison. The AV and NEB have “cage” also at Jer. 5:27 (Heb. kelûḇ, RSV Basket), and the AV at Rev. 18:2 (Gk. phylakē, RSV and NEB “haunt”).
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Cage
CAGE. In Jer 5:27 the Heb. word means the wicker basket in which the fowler placed the captured birds. Such baskets, filled to capacity with living birds, were probably a familiar scene in the markets of ancient cities. See Basket.
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Cage
Cage. The term so rendered in Jer. 5:27 is more properly a trap, in which decoy birds were placed. In Rev. 18:2 the Greek term means a prison.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Cage
CAGE (klûb). A “basket” or “cage” for keeping birds (Jer. 5:27) and fruit (Amos 8:1). On the Taylor Prism in the British Museum, Sennacherib says of Hezekiah: “Himself like a caged bird, I shut up in Jerusalem.…” A place of confinement for prisoners in transit (Ezek. 19:9).
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Cage
Cage(Heb. kelub’, Jer. 5:27, marg. “coop;” rendered “basket” in Amos 8:1), a basket of wicker-work in which birds were placed after being caught. In Rev. 18:2 it is the rendering of the Greek phulake, properly a prison or place of confinement.
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Cage
CAGE — an enclosure for confining birds (Jer. 5:27) and other animals. Ezekiel’s poetic description of a “young lion” that is captured and put in a cage (Ezek. 19:2–9) is a reference to King Jehoiachin of Judah, who was taken captive by Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon. The Hebrew word frequently rendered
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
CAGE
CAGE<kaj> (כְּלוּב‎ [kelubh]; [φυλακή, phulake]): The earliest known form of cage made to confine a bird, for the pleasure of its song or the beauty of its coloring, was a crude affair of willows or other pliable twigs. Later cages were made of pottery, and now they are mostly made of wire. References
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Cage
Cage. The Hebrew term thus rendered in Jer. 5:27 is more properly a trap in which decoy-birds were placed. In Rev. 18:2 the Greek term thus rendered means a prison.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Cage
cage. This English term is used in Bible versions to render two rare Hebrew words, referring to an enclosure for confining birds (Jer. 5:27; the Hebrew term here, kĕlûb H3990, is used of a fruit basket in Amos 8:1–2) or animals (Ezek. 19:9; Heb. sûgar H6050). The KJV uses the word also in the NT,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Cage
CAGE, kāj (כְּלוּב‎, kelūbh; φυλακή, phulakḗ): The earliest known form of cage made to confine a bird, for the pleasure of its song or the beauty of its coloring, was a crude affair of willows or other pliable twigs. Later cages were made of pottery, and now they are mostly made of wire. References
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
CAGE
CAGE [סָגַרsaghar, סוּגַרsughar; γαλεάγρα galeagra]. Indicates an enclosure that usually contained birds or animals within bars. Stocks or human cages were commonly used for captives by the brutal conquerors of the ANE. In Ezek 19:9 the word usually translated cage can also mean a wooden or iron neck-stock.