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Burning Bush
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Burning Bush
Burning Bush The bush that was burning but not consumed, from which the Angel of Yahweh (Exod 3:2), or Yahweh Himself (Exod 3:4), spoke to Moses. The Hebrew סְנֶה‎ (seneh), used elsewhere at Deut 33:16 and 1 Sam 14:4, indicates that it was a kind of bramble.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Burning Bush
Burning Bush. Flaming bush on Mt Horeb, where Moses experienced God’s presence and received the commission to lead the people of Israel out of Egypt (Ex 3:1–15; Mk 12:26; Lk 20:37; Acts 7:30–34). The paradox of a plant burning without being consumed provided the means by which God revealed his covenant
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Bush, The Burning
Bush, The Burning [Heb. seneh; Gk. bátos]. The shrub at the locale of a theophany on Mt. Horeb (Ex. 3:2–4; cf. Dt. 33:16). Moses’ attention was attracted by the phenomenon of a bush apparently on fire and yet not being consumed. Modern attempts at identifying the supposed species of shrub are unconvincing.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Burning Bush
BURNING BUSH Flaming bush on Mt Horeb, where Moses experienced God’s presence and received the commission to lead the people of Israel out of Egypt (Ex 3:1–15; Mk 12:26; Lk 20:37; Acts 7:30–34). The enigma of a plant burning without being consumed provided the opportunity for God to reveal his name,
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Burning Bush
BURNING BUSH. The flaming bush by which God attracted Moses’ attention and revealed Himself at the time of Moses’ call to become Israel’s deliverer (Ex 3:2–4). The Heb. word for “bush,” sneh, is found only in this passage and Deut 33:16. It was probably an unidentified thorn bush of the acacia family.
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Burning Bush
BURNING BUSH. The call of Moses to be Israel’s deliverer took place when he turned to see the marvel of the bush which burned and yet was not consumed (Ex. 3:3). Like all such manifestations which the Bible records—e.g. the smoking-flashing oven (Gn. 15:17) and the cloudy-fiery pillar (Ex. 13:21)—the
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
burning bush, the
burning bush, the. The scene of *Moses’ call, where the Angel of Yahweh appeared to him ‘in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush’ (Exod. 3:2–4). The burning bush has frequently been used by Christian writers as a type of the Blessed Virgin.
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Burning Bush
BURNING BUSH — the flaming shrub at Mount Horeb through which Moses became aware of the presence of God (Ex. 3:2–4). Attracted by the phenomenon, Moses turned aside to see why the bush did not burn. Some scholars believe the burning bush symbolized Israel, which had endured and survived the “fiery trial”
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Burning Bush
Burning BushThe burning bush is a theophany. While in one sense Exodus 3:1–4:23 is about Moses’s encounter with the divine, it is primarily concerned with God’s revelation of himself (see Deut 33:16; Mk 12:26; Lk 20:37; Acts 7:30–34). Accordingly we find God sharing his personal name with Moses in Exodus
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Burning Bush
BURNING BUSH In Exod. 3:2 Moses’ attention was arrested by the sight of a bush that burned without being consumed by the fire. When he turned aside to investigate, the Lord spoke to him from the bush, instructing him to return to Egypt to deliver the Hebrew people from slavery. Some attempts have been
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Burning Bush
burning bush. According to Exod. 3:2, God appeared to Moses “in flames of fire from within a bush. Moses saw that though the bush was on fire it did not burn up” (the term for “bush” here, sĕneh H6174, appears also in vv. 3–4 and in Deut. 33:16). Scholars who do not believe that this phenomenon was
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