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Bronze Age
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Archaeological period (3300–1200 bc) in ancient Palestine characterized by the widespread transition from agrarian to urban society and the emergence of the Canaanite civilization. The term originated as part of the three-age system adopted in the early stages of modern archaeology to establish a time frame for historical events.The rudimentary titles of Stone Age, Bronze Age, and Iron Age correspond with the stone and metal implements used by ancient societies, but human material culture actually reflects greater complexity (Daniel, The Three Ages, 5). At the end of the Stone Age, the Chalcolithic (literally, “Copper-Stone”; 4500–3300 bc) cultures of Palestine were replaced by the urbanized societies of the Bronze Age, which lasted about 2,100 years until the Iron Age (1200–586 bc).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Bronze Age
Bronze Age Archaeological period (3300–1200 bc) in ancient Palestine characterized by the widespread transition from agrarian to urban society and the emergence of the Canaanite civilization. The term originated as part of the three-age system adopted in the early stages of modern archaeology to establish
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Bronze Age
Bronze AgeBronze Age, the era spanning roughly the third and second millennia (ca. 3200-1200 b.c.) in the biblical lands of Palestine and Transjordan. There are three major subdivisions: the Early Bronze Age (EB; 3200-2000), the Middle Bronze Age (MB; 2000-1500), and the Late Bronze Age (LB; 1500-1200).
Compton’s Encyclopedia
Bronze Age
Bronze AgeDuring the stage in human history called the Bronze Age, people first began to use bronze to make tools, weapons, armor, and other implements. This level of development followed the Stone Age, when people made tools primarily of stone. Metal tools represented a significant advance. Unlike
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
BRONZE AGE
BRONZE AGE. An archaeological period spanning 3300–1200 bce that draws its name from the use of BRONZE becoming common for the production of utensils, jewelry, and weapons. The Bronze Age is typically divided into “Early Bronze” (3300–2000 bce), “Middle Bronze” (2000–1550 bce), and “Late Bronze” (1550–1200
1. Bronze Age (3300–1200 BCE)
1. Bronze Age (3300–1200 bce)The earliest recorded occupation on the Ophel Ridge is dated to the Early Bronze Age (3300–2200 bce). Nomadic peoples were attracted there by the Gihon Spring in the bottom of the KIDRON VALLEY. It was a charstic spring characterized by a strong flow over a short period,
A. Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Periods (ca. 4300–2000 BCE)
A. Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Periods (ca. 4300–2000 bce)Settlements with such things as perimeter walls, temples, and other indications of social stratification are known from the 4th and 3rd millennia bce. Megiddo, Jericho and Arad all have Chalcolithic remains, and Ein Gedi possessed a temple
B. Middle Bronze Period (ca. 2000–1550 BCE)
B. Middle Bronze Period (ca. 2000–1550 bce)The land of Canaan had a number of strong cities in the first half of the 2nd millennium bce. Among them were Byblos, Sidon, Dan, Hazor, Megiddo, Beth-shan, Shechem, Shiloh, Jericho, Bethel, Jerusalem, Gezer, Lachish, and Hebron. Some of these could be considered
C. Late Bronze Period (ca. 1550–1200 BCE)
C. Late Bronze Period (ca. 1550–1200 bce)After some political instability in Egypt and Syria-Palestine, a less intensive urban period emerged. There were, of course, cities in the Late Bronze period in Canaan, but some of the impressive Middle Bronze cities experienced destruction in the 16th/15th cent.