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Bridle
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Bridle
Bridle A cord or restraint used to guide or control an animal. Often used symbolically in the Old Testament to describe self-control, oppression, or punishment (2 Kgs 19:28; Job 30:11; Psa 39:1; Prov 26:3; Isa 30:28; 37:29).
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Bridle
BRIDLE. The several words in Heb. and Gr. for “bridle” are used rather loosely in the Bible to refer to either bit (q.v.), bridle, rein (q.v.), or halter, whatever may have been used to guide or check an animal. Usually it was no more than a leather strap with a loop over the upper lip. Sometimes a ring
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Bridle
BRIDLE (Heb. resen, “halter,” Job 30:11; 41:13, NASB, marg.; Isa. 30:28; meteg, strictly the “bit,” as rendered in Ps. 32:9, though NIV has “bridle”; maḥsôm, a “muzzle,” only in 39:1; Gk. chalinos, “bit,” James 3:2; Rev. 14:20). The word bridle is used for that portion of the harness by which the driver
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Bridle
BridleThree Hebrew words are thus rendered in the Authorized Version. (1.) Heb. mahsom’ signifies a muzzle or halter or bridle, by which the rider governs his horse (Ps 39:1).(2.) Meʾtheg, rendered also “bit” in Ps. 32:9, which is its proper meaning. Found in 2 Kings 19:28, where the restraints of
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Bit and Bridle
BIT AND BRIDLE —the bridle refers to the headgear of a harness; the bit is the metal mouthpiece by which the bridle works to control an animal. These two words appear together in Psalm 32:9. James applied the term “bridle” as a symbol of the believer’s submission to God’s control: “If anyone . . . thinks
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Bridle
BridleThe image of the bridle is used in the Bible primarily as an image of restraint and control. Job complains that the afflictions he has received from God have led to his enemies’ throwing off restraint (literally, “letting loose the bridle”) and attacking him (Job 30:11). One of the indicators
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
BIT AND BRIDLE
BIT AND BRIDLE<bri’-d’-l> (מֶתֶג־וֶרֶסֶן‎ [methegh wa-recen]): The two words occur in conjunction (Psalm 32:9 the King James Version, “Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule, which have no understanding; whose mouth must be held in with bit and bridle, lest they come near unto thee”; the Revised
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Bridle
Bridle. To bite on the bridle is to suffer great hardships. The bridle was an instrument for punishing a scold; to bite on the bridle is to suffer this punishment.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Bit and Bridle
bit and bridle. This expression is used in English versions to translate the Hebrew words meteg H5496 and resen H8270 in Ps. 32:9 (the Hebrew text includes a third term, ʿădî H6344, “trappings,” usually left untranslated in this passage). Both terms seem to include the whole controlling harness of
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Bit and Bridle
BIT AND BRIDLE, brīʹdʹl (מֶתֶג־וָבֶסֶן‎, methegh wā-reṣen): The two words occur in conjunction (Ps 32:9 AV, “Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule, which have no understanding; whose mouth must be held in with bit and bridle, lest they come near unto thee”; RV “else they will not come near unto thee,”