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Bowl
Household Objects
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Bowl
Bowl [Heb. sēp̱el] (Jgs. 5:25; 6:38); AV also “lordly dish”; [elōḥîṯ (2 K. 2:20); AV NEW CRUSE; [gullâ] (Eccl. 12:6; Zec. 4:2f; 1 K. 7:41f; 2 Ch. 4:12f); AV also POMMELS; NEB also “bowl-shaped capitals”; [’aggān] (Cant. 7:2); AV, NEB, ROUND GOBLET; [kôs] (Isa. 51:17, 22); AV CUP; [mizrāq]
Pitcher
Pitcher [Heb. kaḏ] (Eccl. 12:6); [gāḇî (a)ʿ] (Jer. 35:5); AV POT; NEB BOWL.The Heb. kaḏ is translated “pitcher” by the AV in most of its thirteen occurrences. Nine of those occurrences are in Gen. 24, the story of Rebekah at the well, and clearly refer to water jars, not pitchers as we know them
Pommel
Pommel [Gk. hypōpiázō—‘strike under the eye,’ ‘give a black eye’] (1 Cor. 9:27). A term that continues the boxing metaphor of v 26, here used figuratively of self-control.For the noun “pommel” in 2 Ch. 4:12f, AV, see Bowl.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Pommel
POMMEL* kjv for “bowl,” part of the capitals of the temple pillars (2 Chr 4:12). See Architecture (Palestinian); Tabernacle; Temple.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Bowl
bowl. Biblical references to bowls are numerous and, on the basis of vocabulary and context, indicate a wide variety of types (Judg. 5:25; 6:38; 2 Kings 2:20; Ezra 1:10; Jer. 52:19). There were large bowls that served as banquet dishes for wine (Amos 6:6) and craters out of which the food of the main
Pitcher
pitcher, a ceramic, glass, or stone container, usually with a single vertical loop handle and a molded lip or inserted spout for pouring, the latter sometimes through a set of sieve holes in the vessel just above the pouring lip. Jeremiah was instructed to bring wine to the Rechabites in pitchers (35:5).
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Bowl
BOWL. A shallow, hollow-shaped vessel, such as a basin or cup. The word bowl is used to translate a variety of Heb. words. Bowls were made of earthenware, metal, or wood. See Pottery. See Dish.Gideon wrung water from fleece into a bowl (Jdg 6:38). Bowls like cups in the shape of almonds decorated the
Pitcher
PITCHER. The translation of three words in the Bible designating containers for liquid.1. Heb. kad, translated improperly as “barrel,” four times as “pitcher.” Rebekah used the kad to water the servant’s camels (Gen 24:14–20, 43 ff.). Gideon used pitchers to shield his torches, and the breaking of them
Pommel
POMMEL. A bowl of oil vessel, named gullâ for its roundness (2 Chr 4:12–13, KJV). Its root is the Heb. gālal meaning “to roll.” In the parallel passage in 1 Kgs 7:41 the term is translated “bowls.” The word is now obsolete in the sense discussed. In the passages above it appears to be a rounded ornament
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Pitcher
Pitcher. This word is used in the Authorized Version to denote the earthen water-jars or pitchers with one or two handles, used chiefly by women for carrying water, as in the story of Rebekah. Gen. 24:15–20; but see Mark 14:13; Luke 22:10. This mode of carrying has been and still is customary both in
Pommels
Pommels, only in 2 Chron. 4:12, 13. In 1 Kings 7:41, “bowls.” The word signifies convex projections belonging to the capitals of pillars.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Bowl
BOWL. The translation of several Heb. words. We have no means of obtaining accurate information as to the material and precise form of these vessels. In the earliest times they were, doubtless, made of wood and shells of the larger kinds of nuts and were used at meals for liquids, broth, or stew (2 Kings
Pitcher
PITCHER. The translation of a variety of Heb. and Gk. terms. Rebekah used a kad, a small jug, for carrying water (Gen. 24:14–18, 20, 43–46; “jar,” NASB and NIV); and the widow of Zarephath stored flour in such a container (1 Kings 17:12–16, marg., NASB, for “bowl”; “barrel,” KJV; “jar,” NIV). The same
Pommel
POMMEL (Heb. gūllâ, “round”). The ball or round ornament on the capital of a column (2 Chron. 4:12, KJV; “bowl,” NASB; “bowl-shaped,” NIV; see also 1 Kings 7:41–42, KJV, NASB, NIV).
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Bowl
BowlThe sockets of the lamps of the golden candlestick of the tabernacle are called bowls (Ex. 25:31, 33, 34; 37:17, 19, 20); the same word so rendered being elsewhere rendered “cup” (Gen. 44:2, 12, 16), and wine “pot” (Jer. 35:5). The reservoir for oil, from which pipes led to each lamp in Zechariah’s
Pitcher
Pitchera vessel for containing liquids. In the East pitchers were usually carried on the head or shoulders (Gen. 24:15–20; Judg. 7:16, 19; Mark 14:13).
Pommels
Pommels(2 Chr. 4:12, 13), or bowls (1 Kings 7:41), were balls or “rounded knobs” on the top of the chapiters (q.v.).
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Bowl
Bowlbowl, an open vessel that is wider than it is deep. Biblical references to bowls are numerous and, on the basis of vocabulary and context, indicate a wide variety of types. There were large bowls that served as banquet dishes for wine (Amos 6:6) and craters out of which the food of the main meal
Pitcher
Pitcherpitcher, a ceramic, glass, or stone container, usually with a single vertical loop handle and a molded lip or inserted spout for pouring, the latter sometimes through a set of sieve holes in the vessel just above the pouring lip. Jeremiah was instructed to bring wine to the Rechabites in pitchers
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Bowl
BOWL — a shallow container for holding food or fluids. In the Old Testament, bowls are often spoken of in connection with the sanctuary and its services. Vessels holding the olive oil for the seven-branched lampstand in the Holy Place were called bowls (Ex. 25:29–34), and the sacrifices offered by the
Pitcher
PITCHER — a vessel for holding liquids; a clay jar or water jug. In the ancient world, pitchers ordinarily had one or two handles, were usually carried on the head or shoulders, and were used mainly by women for carrying water or drawing water from wells (Gen. 24:14). The pitcher used by Rebekah at the
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Bowl
BowlA bowl is a container, usually rounded in shape, that contains either liquids or solids. Often the word is found in a culinary context, though not exclusively. It is related to other types of containers like jars, cups and basins. Although there is overlap between these containers, the bowl might