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Booth
Booths • Cottage • Pavilion
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Booth
Booth. Small temporary hut constructed of branches and sticks when permanent buildings were unavailable. Booths provided shade during the day and protection from the dew and winds during the night (Gn 33:17; Jon 4:5). The word is also used as a figure of speech for something fragile and easily destroyed
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Booth
Booth [Heb. sukkâ, sōḵ (Lam. 2:6); Gk. skēnḗ]; AV also TABERNACLE, PAVILION, COTTAGE, TENT; NEB SHELTER, TABERNACLE, HOUSE, ARBOUR, “under canvas” (2 S. 11:11), “their quarters” (1 K. 20:12, 16). The term sukkâ refers to a hut made of wattled twigs or branches. In countries where trees are abundant
Cottage
Cottage The AV rendering of words translated BOOTH (Isa. 1:8), HUT (Isa. 24:20), and MEADOW (Zeph. 2:6) in the RSV.
Pavilion
Pavilion Used several times by the AV and RSV to render Heb. sukkâ (“covert,” “booth,” or “tent”). In Job 36:29, RSV, it refers to the thick thunderclouds that screen God from human view (AV “tabernacle”; cf. AV 2 S. 22:12 par Ps. 18:11 [MT 12]; see Canopy). In Isa. 4:5, RSV (MT, AV, 4:6), it is a protective
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Booth
BOOTH Small, temporary hut or shelter constructed of branches and sticks when permanent buildings were unavailable. Booths provided shade during the day and protection from the dew and winds during the night (Gn 33:17; Jon 4:5). The word is also used as a figure of speech for something fragile and easily
Pavilion
PAVILION* A translation of the Hebrew word sukkah and sokoh in the kjv. The word sukkah is also translated as “booth” (Gn 33:17), “tabernacle” (Lv 23:34), and “tent” (2 Sm 11:11). Other translations of sokoh are “den” (Ps 10:9), “tabernacle” (76:2), and “covert” (Jer 25:38). The words sukkah and sokoh
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Booth
BOOTH. A hut made of wattled twigs or branches, common as temporary buildings for a person (Jon 4:5), for soldiers (2 Sam 11:11; 1 Kgs 20:12), for harvesters (Lev 23:33 ff.). Job (27:18) used a watchman’s booth as a symbol of impermanence. See Festivals Feast of Tabernacles.
Cottage
COTTAGE. This word appears in the KJV in Isa 1:8 (Heb. sukkâ, “hut”); Isa 24:20 (Heb. mlûnâ; “hut” in RSV); Zeph 2:6 (Heb. kārōth, “hewn out place”; translated “Crete” in LXX, and “meadows” in RSV).The word “cottage” has changed considerably in meaning from its original significance. It is related
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Booth
BOOTH. A word sometimes used in the evv to translate the Hebrew term sukkâ, a booth or rude temporary shelter made of woven boughs (Ne. 8:14–17). This type of structure figured particularly in the annual Feast of *Tabernacles (Lv. 23:34; Dt. 16:13, av, rv ‘tabernacles’), but was also used by armies
Pavilion
PAVILION (Heb. sōḵ, sukkâ). A covered place, tent, booth or shelter, where a person or beast may hide or be sheltered. The same word is translated in av as den (Ps. 10:9), tabernacle (Ps. 76:2), covert (Je. 25:38), booth (Jon. 4:5) and lodge (Is. 1:8), and thus represents something used by beasts,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Booth
Booth (Heb. sukkâ). A temporary place of shelter for people (2 Sam. 11:11; Jonah 4:5) and cattle (Gen. 33:17). These structures were probably made of wattled branches and may have used trees as supports or stilts. At Isa. 1:8 (KJV “cottage”; NIV “shelter”; JB “shanty”) the booth is an image
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Pavilion
Pavilion, a temporary movable tent or habitation.1. Sôc, properly an enclosed place, also rendered “tabernacle,” “covert” and “den”; once only “pavilion.” Ps. 27:5. (Among the Egyptians pavilions were built in a similar style to houses, though on a smaller scale, in various parts of the country, and
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Booth
BOOTH (Heb. sūkkâ, “hut,” or “lair”; often translated “tabernacle” or “pavilion”). A shelter made of branches of trees and shrubs (Gen. 33:17) and serving as a protection against rain, frost, and heat. Such were also the temporary green shelters in which the Israelites celebrated the feast of Booths
Cottage
COTTAGE. A KJV term for a shelter, replaced in the NASB and NIV by “shelter” (Isa. 1:8; Heb. sūkkâ), “shack,” or “hut” (Isa. 24:20; Heb. mlûnâ), and “caves” (Zeph. 2:6; Heb. krôt). The sūkkâ, frequently rendered “booth,” was a hut made of boughs for the purpose of temporary shelter. Being of slight
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Booth
Bootha hut made of the branches of a tree. In such tabernacles Jacob sojourned for a season at a place named from this circumstance Succoth (Gen. 33:17). Booths were erected also at the feast of Tabernacles (q.v.), Lev. 23:42, 43, which commemorated the abode of the Israelites in the wilderness.
Cottage
Cottage(1.) A booth in a vineyard (Isa. 1:8); a temporary shed covered with leaves or straw to shelter the watchman that kept the garden. These were slight fabrics, and were removed when no longer needed, or were left to be blown down in winter (Job 27:18).(2.) A lodging-place (rendered “lodge” in
Pavilion
Paviliona tent or tabernacle (2 Sam. 22:12; 1 Kings 20:12–16), or enclosure (Ps. 18:11; 27:5). In Jer. 43:10 it probably denotes the canopy suspended over the judgement-seat of the king.
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Booth
BOOTH — a temporary shelter made of shrubs and tree branches, which protected cattle against the weather (Gen. 33:17). Booths were used also by keepers of vineyards (Is. 1:8) and soldiers on the battlefield (2 Sam. 11:11).During the Feast of Tabernacles (or Feast of Booths), the Israelites made booths
Pavilion
PAVILION — any kind of temporary shelter, such as a tent, tabernacle, or booth (2 Kin. 16:18; Ps. 27:5; 31:20; Jer. 43:10). Psalm 31:20 refers to the pavilion of God in which the righteous are sheltered. But usually the Hebrew word sukkah refers to a tent or similar kind of shelter. Leviticus 23:42 mentions
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
BOOTH
BOOTH<booth>, <booth>: The Hebrew word [cukkah] (rendered in the King James Version “booth” or “booths,” eleven times; “tabernacle” or “tabernacles,” ten times; “pavilion” or “pavilions,” five times; “cottage” once) means a hut made of wattled twigs or branches (Leviticus 23:42; Nehemiah
PAVILION
PAVILION<pa-vil’-yun>: A covered place, booth, tent, in which a person may be kept hid or secret ([סֹα, cokh], Psalm 27:5; [סֻכּה, cukkah] - the usual term - Psalm 31:20), or otherwise be withdrawn from view. The term is used with reference to God (2 Samuel 22:12; Psalm 18:11); to kings drinking
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Booth
Booth, a hut made of green boughs fixed on upright poles, and thus distinguished from a tent, in which the Israelites were directed to celebrate the feast of tabernacles (Lev. 23:40). This was done in commemoration of their abode in the wilderness.
Cottage
Cotʹtage, the rendering in our English Version of three Hebrew words. The first Hebrew word (sukkahʹ) signifies a hut made of boughs (Isa. 1:8), and is usually translated booth. The second Hebrew word (melunahʹ) signifies a lodging-place, and occurs in Isa. 24:20, where it denotes a hanging bed or hammock
Pavilion
Pa-vilʹion, a tent or temporary tabernacle erected for shelter against the heat of the sun (1 Kings 20:12). It is also used poetically for the dwelling of God (Ps. 18:11), and to image the absolute security of those whom God there shelters (Ps. 27:5; 31:20).
See also
Topics & Themes