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Book of Numbers
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Numbers is the fourth book in the Hebrew Bible and is part of the Torah. It recounts the historic events of Israel’s experience with her God, Yahweh, from her time at Mount Sinai until her arrival at the plains of Moab. The purpose of the book is both theological and practical. Theologically it brings focus to Yahweh’s love for Israel and His patient adherence to the Sinaitic covenant and the promise that His covenant people would indeed inherit the promised land. Practically, it sets many of the patterns of worship and behavior that would be necessary when they inhabited the promised land. More specifically, it provides historic examples of the consequences for unfaithfulness and ungratefulness for Yahweh’s provision for them.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Numbers, Book of
Numbers, Book of Numbers is the fourth book in the Hebrew Bible and is part of the Torah. It recounts the historic events of Israel’s experience with her God, Yahweh, from her time at Mount Sinai until her arrival at the plains of Moab. The purpose of the book is both theological and practical. Theologically
Numbers, Book of, Critical Issues
Numbers, Book of, Critical Issues Surveys significant scholarship on Numbers from recent decades as evidenced in commentaries, ancient-version studies, historical and literary-critical analyses, and theological inquiries.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Numbers, Book of
Numbers, Book of. Fourth book of the English Bible. Its title is the English translation of the Latin Vulgate title, Numeri. The book takes this name from the fact that several rosters of various kinds are recorded in the book, specifically, the two army musters in chapters 1 and 26, the tribal camp
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Numbers, Book of
NUMBERS, BOOK OF Fourth book of the English Bible. Its title is the English translation of the Latin Vulgate title, Numeri. The book takes this name from the fact that several rosters of various kinds are recorded in the book, specifically, the two army musters in chapters 1 and 26, the tribal camp and
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Numbers, Book Of
Numbers, book of, the fourth of the Five Books of Moses (Torah) in the Tanakh (Jewish Bible) and the fourth book of the Pentateuch of the Christian ot; it follows Leviticus and precedes Deuteronomy. Its Hebrew name is bemidbar, “in the wilderness,” taken from the first sentence of the book, “And the
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Numbers, Book of (Writing)
NUMBERS, BOOK OF. This fourth book of Moses’ Pentateuch is described more accurately by the name it bears in the Heb. Bible, b-midbar, “in the wilderness.” The events take place in the wilderness (e.g., Sinai, 1:1; Zin, 20:1) and at the oases adjoining the wilderness, as, e.g., Kadesh-barnea (q.v.) in
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Numbers, Book of (Writing)
NUMBERS, BOOK OF. The synagogue named this book after its first word or after one of the first words (wayeḏabbēr, ‘and he spoke’; or bemiḏbar, ‘in the desert’). The Gk. translators called it arithmoi, ‘numbers’. Where the four other parts of the Pentateuch are concerned, the Gk. names are commonly
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Numbers, Book Of
Numbers, Book ofThe fourth book of the Pentateuch. It recounts the story of the Israelites’ preparations for departure from Mt. Sinai and their journey through the wilderness to the Plains of Moab, across the Jordan River from the city of Jericho.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Numbers, Book Of
NUMBERS, BOOK OF The fourth book of the Pentateuch in the Old Testament. Numbers takes its name from the censuses recounted at the beginning and near the end of the book (chaps. 1–4 and 26). This book continues the story of the Exodus and ends with the arrival of the Israelites just outside the Promised
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Numbers, Book of
Numbers, Book of. The fourth Book of the *Pentateuch. Its English title, which follows that of the Greek and Latin versions, is explained by its two records of a census (1–4 and 26). The Hebrew title, ‘Bemidhbar’ (Heb.בְּמִדְבַּר, the fourth word, meaning ‘in the wilderness’), is more appropriate, however,
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