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Book of Baruch
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A text that pseudonymously presents itself as a work of, and about, Baruch written to exiles in Babylon early in the exilic period. The Letter of Jeremiah is often attached to the end of the book of Baruch, as its conclusion; the two are further linked by “Baruch” who is a companion or secretary to Jeremiah. Sometimes the letters are considered Additions to Jeremiah.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Baruch, Book of and Letter of Jeremiah
Baruch, Book of A text that pseudonymously presents itself as a work of, and about, Baruch written to exiles in Babylon early in the exilic period. The Letter of Jeremiah is often attached to the end of the book of Baruch, as its conclusion; the two are further linked by “Baruch” who is a companion or
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Baruch, Book of
BARUCH, BOOK OF. An apocryphal text containing five chapters (in the Vulgate and Authorized Version, the Epistle of Jeremiah is added as a sixth chapter) attributed to Baruch, the son of Neriah, Jeremiah’s secretary and amanuensis (Jer 36:1–32; 43:1–7). This is one of three compositions among the Apocrypha
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Baruch, Book of
BARUCH, BOOK OF Deuterocanonical work named after Baruch, who was secretary to the prophet Jeremiah. In antiquity several books were ascribed to Baruch, whose well-known connection with Jeremiah undoubtedly increased their circulation and acceptance. This one emphasizes the righteousness and wisdom of
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Baruch, Book Of
Baruch, book of, a short collection of prayers and poems from diverse sources attributed to Baruch, Jeremiah’s scribe (Jer. 36:4), and included in the lxx. It is sometimes termed 1 Baruch to distinguish it from two pseudepigraphical writings, the Syriac Apocalypse of Baruch (2 Baruch), and the Greek
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Baruch, Book Of
Baruch, Book ofA five-chapter pseudepigraphic work attributed to Baruch, the highly placed Jerusalem scribe who appears in the book of Jeremiah (Jer. 32, 36, 43, 45). It is preserved in the Greek LXX, where it immediately follows the book of Jeremiah. Bar. 1:1–3:8 and perhaps the whole book were translated
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Baruch, Book of (Writing)
Baruch, Book of. †A book of the Old Testament Apocrypha, attributed to Baruch, the secretary of Jeremiah. Scholars agree that it consists of three distinct sections written by different authors and combined by a later editor. Although the book survives in a Greek version (with later translations into
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Baruch, Book Of
BARUCH, BOOK OF A canonical book of the Old Testament that bears the name of Baruch, Jeremiah’s personal companion and secretary (Jer 36:1–32; 43:1–7). Although the book of Baruch is not in the Jewish or Protestant canon, it is considered canonical by the Catholic Church (see Deuterocanonical books).
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Baruch, Book of
Baruch, Book of. A Book of the *Apocrypha to which is attached the ‘Epistle of *Jeremy’ (q.v.), the two together, with *Lamentations, forming appendices to the Book of *Jeremiah. The book consists of (1) an introduction, which professes to have been written by Baruch, the disciple of Jeremiah, and
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Baruch Book of
Ba´ruch, Book of. One of the apocryphal books of the Old Testament. The book was held in little esteem by the Jews, and both its date and authorship are very uncertain.
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Baruch, the Book of (Writing)
Baruch, the Book OfBaruch, the Book of, a short collection of prayers and poems from diverse sources, attributed to Baruch, Jeremiah’s scribe (Jer. 36:4), and found in the Septuagint (lxx). It is sometimes termed 1 Baruch to distinguish it from two pseudepigraphical writings, The Syriac Apocalypse
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
BARUCH, BOOK OF (Writing)
BARUCH, BOOK OFOne of the Apocryphal or Deutero-canonical books, standing between Jeremiah and Lamentations in the Septuagint, but in the Vulgate (Jerome’s Latin Bible, 390-405 A.D.) after these two books.