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Book of 1-2 Kings
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Kings, First and Second Book of
Kings, First and Second Books of Historical narrative of the fall of Israelite and Judaean Monarchies. Narrates the tragic history of the united monarchy and the divided monarchy, beginning with Solomon and culminating in the exiles of Israel by Assyria and Judah by Babylon.
Kings, First and Second Books of, Critical Issues
Kings, First and Second Books of, Critical Issues Overviews the two main categories of critical investigation concerning 1 and 2 Kings (the book of Kings): theories regarding composition history, and issues pertaining to historicity. Discusses inscriptional and archaeological evidence, with attention
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Kings, Book of 1–2
KINGS, BOOK OF 1-2. The eleventh and twelfth books in the Bible (Catholic and Protestant canons). In the Jewish canon Kings is found in the second division of the Hebrew Bible, known as nĕbı̂ʾı̂m, “Prophets,” where it constitutes the fourth book of the “Former Prophets,” after Joshua, Judges, and Samuel.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Kings, Books of First and Second
Kings, Books of First and Second. Books continuing the history of the covenant people as recorded in Joshua, Judges, and the Books of Samuel. The record in Kings begins with the events at the end of David’s reign (1 Kgs 1; 2). It continues through the reign of Solomon (1 Kgs 2–11); the disruption of
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Kings, Books Of
Kings, Books Of The OT books dealing with the period covered by the reigns of the kings of Israel and Judah, from a time shortly before the death of David until the Exile and the release of King Jehoiachin from prison in Babylon (561 b.c.). The whole is considered from a theological perspective. I.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Kings, Books of First and Second
KINGS, BOOKS OF FIRST AND SECOND Books continuing the history of the covenant people as recorded in Joshua, Judges, and the books of Samuel. The record in Kings begins with the events at the end of David’s reign (1 Kgs 1–2). It continues through the reign of Solomon (chs 3–11); the histories of the divided
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Kings, First and Second Books Of
Kings, First and Second Books of, biblical writings that follow the books of Samuel in the Tanakh (Jewish Bible) and in the Christian ot; they are found in the Prophets, or Nevi’im, section of the Tanakh and are the fifth and sixth books of its Former Prophets subcollection. Originally, 1 and 2 Kings
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Kings, I and Ii
KINGS, I and II. These two books originally were one book or scroll in Heb. The division into two volumes in the Heb. text appeared first in a mid–15th cen. MS and then in Daniel Bomberg’s printed Heb. Bible in a.d. 1516–17. Since the Gr. text, however, required twice as much space as the Heb. in which
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Kings, Books of (Writing)
KINGS, BOOKS OF. The closing part of the narrative which begins in Genesis and focuses on the story of Israel from her origins in Egypt to the ending of her political independence by the Babylonians. The division of the books of Kings from the books of Samuel is an artificial one, as is the further division
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Kings, Books Of
Kings, Books ofThe final books of the Deuteronomistic history and the last of the Former Prophets. The title reflects the contents and core organizing principle of these books. Kings structures the history of Judah and Israel according to individual reigns and evaluates the loyalty of the whole nation
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Kings First and Second Books of
Kings, First and Second Books of, originally only one book in the Hebrew canon, form in the LXX and the Vulgate the third and fourth books of Kings (the books of Samuel being the first and second). It must be remembered that the division between the books of Kings and Samuel is equally artificial, and
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Kings, 1 and 2, Books of
KINGS, 1 AND 2, BOOKS OF. These books are named from the opening word of 1 Kings in the Hebrew text, whammelek, meaning “and the king,” and from the fact that this section of Scripture deals with the kings of Israel and Judah in their historical setting, in one case to the fall of Samaria (722–721 b.c.)
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