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Boil
Blain • Boils • Botch • Seethe • Sod • Sodden
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Boil
Boil. Inflamed localized swelling on the skin. In modern medicine the term boil is restricted to a pus-filled swelling caused by infectious germs, usually staphylococci. The pus is a mixture of germs and white blood cells, which are the body’s defense against germs. Although painful, boils usually heal
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Boil
Boil [Heb. šeḥîn; Gk. hélkē; Ugar. šḫn—‘burn’; Akk. šaḫānu—‘grow hot’; Egyp sḥn]. Furunculus, an inflamed swelling of tissue surrounding a skin follicle, often followed by discharge of pus and necrosis of the core. The Hebrew term appears to have described a variety of swellings, not all
Botch
Botch (Dt. 28:27, 35, AV). Archaic term for Boil.Boundary stone (kudurru) of Nebuchadrezzar I, from Nippur (12th cent. b.c.). Such stones publicized royal grants, and the emblems of deities and inscribed curses and blessings discouraged their removal. (University Museum, University of Pennsylvania)
Seethe
Seethe An old English term meaning “boil” used by the AV to render the Heb. piel of bāšal (lit “boil”; cf. RSV, NEB) in Ex. 16:23; 23:19; 29:31; 34:26; Dt. 14:21; etc. The AV also uses the archaic past tense “sod” (2 Ch. 35:13; Lam. 4:10), the passive “be sodden” (pual of bāšal, Ex. 12:9; Lev. 6:28;
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Boil
BOIL Inflamed localized swelling on the skin. In modern medicine the term “boil” is restricted to a pus-filled swelling caused by infectious germs, usually staphylococci. The pus is a mixture of germs and white blood cells, which are the body’s defense against germs. Although painful, boils usually heal
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Seethe
SEETHE. The Heb. verb bāshal means to cook by boiling or stewing, whether the food is manna (Ex 16:23) or vegetables (2 Kgs 4:38) or meat (Ex 29:31) or bones (Ezk 24:5). The Israelites were forbidden to seethe a young goat in the milk of its mother (Ex 23:19; 34:26; Deut 14:21), which according to the
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Boil
Boil. †An inflamed swelling of tissue, sometimes of a staphylococcal nature (Heb. šeḥin Ugar. šḫn “burn”). The boils of the sixth Egyptian plague (Exod. 9:9–11) were related to blains (Heb. ˒aḇa˓bu˓ōṯ “blisters, vesicles,” KoB, p. 8), while Job’s “loathsome sores” (Job 2:7; JB “malignant
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Seethe
SEETHE (Heb. bāshal), Seething pot (Heb. nā-paḥ). The archaic English terms refer to boiling (so NASB and NIV, Ex. 16:23; 23:19; Job 41:20; Jer. 1:13; etc.).
Sod, Sodden
SOD, SODDEN. The archaic English terms are replaced in the NASB and NIV by cooked (Gen. 25:29; from Heb. zûd) or boiled (2 Chron. 35:13; Ex. 12:9; Lev. 6:28; and elsewhere; from Heb. bāshal).
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Boil
Boil(rendered “botch” in Deut. 28:27, 35), an aggravated ulcer, as in the case of Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:7; Isa. 38:21) or of the Egyptians (Ex. 9:9, 10, 11; Deut. 28:27, 35). It designates the disease of Job (2:7), which was probably the black leprosy.
Botch
Botchthe name given in Deut. 28:27, 35 to one of the Egyptian plagues (Ex. 9:9). The word so translated is usually rendered “boil” (q.v.).
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Sod
Sodsod, an archaic term used in the kjv for boiled food (Gen. 25:29; 2 Chron. 35:13; Lam. 4:10).
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
BOIL (1)
BOIL (1)(noun) (שְׁחִין‎ [shechin]; [ἕλκος, helkos]): A localized inflamed swelling. The Hebrew word is derived from a root probably meaning “to burn,” and is used as a generic term for the sores in the sixth plague of Egypt (Exodus 9:9-11); for a sore which might be confounded with leprosy (Leviticus
SEETHE
SEETHE<seth>: Old English for “boil”; past tense, “sod” (Genesis 25:29), past participle, “sodden” (Lamentations 4:10). See Exodus 23:19 the King James Version.
Compton’s Encyclopedia
boil
boilA boil (or furuncle) is a staphylococcus skin infection characterized by a painful swelling filled with pus; hard to the touch and located at the site of a hair follicle; healing begins after pus is discharged; occurs on hairy body areas exposed to friction; keeping area clean is usually only treatment,
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Botch
Botch. The Hebrew word thus rendered in our Authorized Version (Deut. 28:27, 35) is elsewhere rendered “boil” (Ex. 9:9, 10), and has the sense of a cutaneous inflammatory eruption.
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Boil
BOIL General term used in the Bible to describe inflamed swellings of the skin. Boils are mentioned in connection with blains (KJV, an inflammatory swelling or sore) in the sixth plague on Egypt (Exod. 9:9–10). Since this plague affected both animals and men, many have suggested the malignant pustule
Botch
BOTCH Old English term used in the KJV that means “boil” (Deut. 28:27, 35).