Loading…
Bloodguilt
Bloodguiltiness
Dictionaries
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Bloodguilt
BLOODGUILT. The pollution or guilt incurred when life is taken outside of the legal prescriptions defined in the Hebrew Bible. “Bloudgyltynesse” entered the English language through Coverdale’s 1535 translation of Ps 51:16, but the notion that blood wrongly shed makes for guilt as indelible as blood
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Bloodguilt
Bloodguilt. Term used in some English Bibles to translate a Hebrew word meaning “blood” or “bloods” (Ex 22:2, 3; Lv 17:4; 1 Sm 25:26, 33; Hos 12:14). The translation “bloodguiltiness” occurs only in Psalm 51:14. The plural form almost invariably means the shedding of blood, but the singular can mean
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Bloodguiltiness
Bloodguiltiness The Heb. dām is rendered “bloodguilt” six times in the RSV, the AV giving “blood” and the NEB “murder,” “bloodshed,” etc. “Bloodguiltiness” (dām) is found only in Ps. 51:14 in the AV and RSV, the NEB rendering it “bloodshed.” Ezk. 18:13 seems to indicate that these terms do not necessarily
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Bloodguilt
BLOODGUILT* Term used in some English Bibles to translate a Hebrew word meaning “blood” or “bloods” (Ex 22:2–3; Lv 17:4; 1 Sm 25:26, 33; Hos 12:14). The translation “bloodguiltiness” occurs only in Psalm 51:14. The plural form almost invariably means the shedding of blood, but the singular can mean blood
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Bloodguilt
bloodguilt, guilt incurred through an unnecessary shedding of blood (Deut. 19:10). In Exod. 22:2–3, bloodguilt is incurred by killing a thief caught in the act of breaking in after sunrise. Num. 35:27 says that no bloodguilt is incurred when an avenger kills a murderer who has strayed outside an appointed
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Bloodguilt
BloodguiltGuilt incurred from the unjustified killing of an animal or human. Specific infractions include failing to bring a slaughtered animal to the tabernacle for sacrifice (Lev. 17:4) and the “deliberate murder” of a thief who breaks in after sunrise (Exod. 22:3; in contrast to v. 2 [MT 1], the
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Bloodguilt
Bloodguilt (Heb. dām, dāmîm “blood”). The legal guilt incurred basically by the shedding of animal (e.g., Lev. 17:4 regarding a sacrifice outside the tabernacle) or human blood, although the sentence might be extended also to other serious crimes (Lev. 20:18; cf. Josh. 2:19; 1 Kgs. 2:37; Ezek.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
BLOODGUILTINESS
BLOODGUILTINESS<blud-gilt’-i-nes>: Found in the King James Version only in Psalm 51:14. The Revised Version (British and American) adds Exodus 22:2, 3; 1 Samuel 25:26, 33. Ezekiel 18:13 seems to indicate that the phrase does not necessarily signify bloodshed, but any grievous sin which,
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Bloodguilt
BLOODGUILT Guilt usually incurred through bloodshed. Bloodguilt made a person ritually unclean (Num. 35:33–34) and was incurred by killing a person who did not deserve to die (Deut. 19:10; Jer. 26:15; Jon. 1:14). Killing in self-defense and execution of criminals are exempted from bloodguilt (Exod. 22:2;
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Bloodguilt
bloodguilt. This term (KJV, “bloodguiltiness” in Ps. 51:14) is sometimes used as a rendering of the Hebrew word for blood, dām H1947, in its plural (intensive) form, dāmîm. It occurs only twice in the NIV (Ps. 51:14; Joel 3:21), but more frequently in the NRSV (e.g., Exod. 22:2; Deut. 19:10; 1 Sam.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Bloodguiltiness
BLOODGUILTINESS, blud-giltʹi-nes: Found in the AV only in Ps 51:14. RV adds Ex 22:2, 3; 1 S 25:26, 33; Ezk 18:13 seems to indicate that the phrase does not necessarily signify bloodshed, but any grievous sin which, if it remains, will block God’s favor to His land and people (cf Dt 21:8; Isa 1:15). Ps
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
BLOODGUILT
BLOODGUILT. “Bloodguilt” was coined by early Bible translators to translate the Hebrew word dam (דָּם) “blood” when it meant “responsibility for felonious homicide.”Dam bears an amazing range of meanings in biblical Hebrew. Because the body fluid was thought to bear the life of the animal or human,
Key passages
Ex 22:2–3

“ ‘If a thief is found in the act of breaking in and he is struck and he dies, there is not bloodguilt for him. (If the sun has risen over him, there is bloodguilt for him. He will make full restitution. If he does not have enough, he will be sold for his theft.

Le 17:4

and he does not bring it to the tent of assembly’s entrance to present an offering to Yahweh before Yahweh’s tabernacle, then that man shall be accounted bloodguilty—he has poured out blood, and that man shall be cut off from the midst of his people.

See also
Topics & Themes