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Black Obelisk
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A bas-relief sculpture that commemorates the military exploits of Assyrian King Shalmaneser III (r. 858–824 bc) during the first 31 years of his reign. The obelisk features five rows of reliefs that depict five subdued kings bringing tribute to Shalmaneser, one of whom is widely believed to be Jehu of Israel (reigned 841–814 bc). However, McCarter has argued that it is more likely Jehoram (see McCarter, “Yaw, Son of Omri”).Jehu is shown on his hands and knees before Shalmaneser and is referred to as “Jehu (Ia-ú-a), son of Omri.” The text says that Shalmaneser received from him “silver, gold, a golden saplu-bowl, a golden vase with pointed bottom, golden tumblers, golden buckets, tin, a staff for a king, and a wooden puruhtu” (ANET, 281). His tribute is dated around 841 bc.The obelisk was created from black limestone in Calah (the modern city of Nimrud) and erected in 825 bc. It was discovered there in 1846 and is now housed in the British Museum.For more on the relationship between Israel and Assyria, see this article: Palestine, Administration of, Neo-Assyrian.
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The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Black Obelisk
Black Obelisk A bas-relief sculpture that commemorates the military exploits of Assyrian King Shalmaneser III (r. 858–824 bc) during the first 31 years of his reign. The obelisk features five rows of reliefs that depict five subdued kings bringing tribute to Shalmaneser, one of whom is widely believed
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Black Obelisk
BLACK OBELISK* Shaft of black limestone describing the military successes of Shalmaneser III of Assyria (858–824 bc) during the first 31 years of his reign. Six and a half feet (2 meters) high, smoothed off on its four sides, the obelisk has five rows of bas-reliefs extending around it with inscriptions
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
OBELISK, BLACK
OBELISK, BLACK. A black limestone OBELISK discovered at the ancient Assyrian capital CALAH (modern Nimrud). The Assyrian king SHALMANESER III (858–824 bce) erected it there near the end of his reign (ca. 827 bce) during a period of civil unrest in order to celebrate his achievements. The obelisk is four-sided
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