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Bishlam
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Bishlam
Bishlam (בִּשְׁלָם‎, bishlam). A leader who wrote a letter to Artaxerxes complaining about the rebuilding of Jerusalem (Ezra 4:7).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Bishlam (Person)
BISHLAM (PERSON) [Heb bišlām (בִּשְׁלָם)]. One of several men who were party to a letter written to King Artaxerxes of Persia (Ezra 4:7 = 1 Esdr 2:16). The Heb word is thus understood to be a proper name by 1 Esdras (LXX 2:14)—Bēlemos—a transliteration Torrey (1908) suggests resulted from the accidental
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Bishlam
Bishlam. Resident of the vicinity of Jerusalem who opposed the rebuilding of the city after the exile. He and his associates wrote a letter complaining about the rebuilding to the Persian king Artaxerxes (Ezr 4:7).The western hill Israelite broad wall of the city of Jerusalem.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Bishlam
Bishlam bishʹləm [Heb. bišlām—‘peaceful’ (?); Gk. en eirḗnȩ̄—‘in peace,’ Apoc. Bēlemus]; AV and NEB Apoc. BELEMUS. One of three foreign colonists who wrote a letter of complaint against the Jews to Artaxerxes (Ezr. 4:7; cf. 1 Esd. 2:16). The LXX renders Bishlam en eirḗnȩ̄, “in peace,” as though
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Bishlam
BISHLAM Resident of the vicinity of Jerusalem who opposed the rebuilding of the city after the exile. He and his associates wrote a letter complaining about the rebuilding to the Persian king Artaxerxes (Ezr 4:7).
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Bishlam
BISHLAM. A Persian official, possibly satrap, who complained to Artaxerxes against the Jews under Zerubbabel who were rebuilding the city (Ezr 4:7).
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Bishlam
Bishlam (Heb. bišlām)One of the Persian officials who sent a letter to King Artaxerxes I objecting to the building activities at Jerusalem (Ezra 4:7). Bishlam may be an Aramaic term meaning “son of peace” (cf. LXX en eirḗnē, “in peace”; but cf. 1 Esdr. 2:16).
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Bishlam
Bishlam [bĭshˊləm] (Heb. bišlām, possibly “peaceful”). One of the Persian officials who sent a letter to King Artaxerxes I objecting to the building activities at Jerusalem (Ezra 4:7). It is more likely that Bishlam is not a personal name, but rather an Aramaic term meaning “son of peace” (cf. LXX
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Bishlam
BISH´LAM (bishʹlam; “in peace”). Apparently an officer of Artaxerxes in Palestine at the time of the return of Zerubbabel from captivity. He wrote to the king against the Jews who were rebuilding the Temple (Ezra 4:7), 529 b.c.
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Bishlam
BISHLAM [BISH lum] (son of peace) — a resident of Palestine at the time when Zerubbabel returned from captivity. Bishlam wrote a letter of protest to Artaxerxes, king of Persia, because the Jews were rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem (Ezra 4:7).
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
BISHLAM
BISHLAM<bish’-lam> (בִּשְׁלָם‎ [bishlam], “peaceful” (?)): One of three foreign colonists who wrote a letter of complaint against the Jews to Artaxerxes (Ezra 4:7 = 1 Esdras 2:16). In 1 Esdras the reading is “Belemus.” “And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredath, Tabeel, and the
BELEMUS
BELEMUS<bel’-e-mus> ([Βήλεμος, Belemos]; Balsamus): An officer of King Artaxerxes in Palestine associated with Beeltethmus in hindering the rebuilding of the temple (1 Esdras 2:16): called Bishlam in Ezra 4:7.
The Ultimate Who’s Who in the Bible
Bishlam
Bishlam [Bish-luhm](Hebrew origin: In peace)(Ezra 4:7). 6th century b.c. Bishlam, Tabeel, and Mithredath, the non-Jews who lived in the land of Israel, offered to help the returnees from Babylon in the reconstruction of the Temple. When their offer was rejected, they became offended and angry. As an
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