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Bel and the Dragon
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A set of short stories in which Daniel exposes the absurdity of two (possibly Babylonian) cults. These texts are part of the Additions to Daniel, which are categorized as Apocrypha by Protestants but are included in the canon of several other church traditions. In the first story, Daniel demonstrates to King Cyrus that the statue of Bel cannot actually eat food offerings; in the second story, David kills a revered serpent/dragon. This act angers the king’s subjects and they throw Daniel in a lions’ den, where he is miraculously fed by Habakkuk, who is presumably the prophet identified with the book of Habakkuk.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon A set of short stories in which Daniel exposes the absurdity of two (possibly Babylonian) cults. These texts are part of the Additions to Daniel, which are categorized as Apocrypha by Protestants but are included in the canon of several other church traditions. In the first story,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon NEB DANIEL, BEL, AND THE SNAKE. A book of the OT Apocrypha, an addition to the book of Daniel along with Song of the Three Young Men and Susanna.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon, one of the Additions to Daniel found at the end of that book in the lxx (and in the Theodotion version of Daniel, a second-century ce Greek translation). It may have been composed in Hebrew and added to some manuscripts of the Hebrew-Aramaic version of Daniel during the course of
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon. †The last of the additions to Daniel, appended as ch. 14 in the LXX and Vulgate as well as in modern Roman Catholic versions and as ch. 13 in Theodotion’s translation.This addition contains two stories whose primary purpose is to demonstrate the folly of idolatry. In the first
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon (or Bel and the Serpent [or Snake]). Two stories attached to the Book of *Daniel in certain Gk. MSS (*Septuagint and *Theodotion) of the OT and hence included (as a single item) in the *Apocrypha of the English Bible. The former recounts (vv. 1–22; [Vulg.] Dan. 13:65–14:21) how
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the DragonBel and the Dragon, one of the Additions to Daniel found at the end of that book in both the Septuagint and Theodotion, Greek translations of the Hebrew ot. It was probably composed in Hebrew and added to some manuscripts of the Hebrew-Aramaic version of Daniel during the course of
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon. An apocryphal addition to the book of Daniel, consisting of two distinct but closely related stories that ridicule Babylonian idolatry. It is one of three additions that appear in the Greek and Latin versions of Daniel, though they are not found in the Hebrew canon. The other two
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
BEL
BEL AND THE DRAGON [Βὴλ καὶ Δράκων Bēl kai Drakōn]. Two short stories, in the SEPTUAGINT (Dan 14) and THEODOTION (Dan 13), are part of a tradition about Daniel (see DANIEL, ADDITIONS TO; DANIEL, BOOK OF). Perhaps the account of how Daniel exposes the false god Bel (from baʿal [בַּעַל], meaning “Lord”)
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