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Bel
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Bel
Bel (בֵּל‎, bel; βηλ, bēl). A general title meaning “lord” or “master.” Also refers to the Babylonian deity Marduk in the Old Testament. Nearly synonymous with the Akkadian “lord,” applied to the gods.
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon A set of short stories in which Daniel exposes the absurdity of two (possibly Babylonian) cults. These texts are part of the Additions to Daniel, which are categorized as Apocrypha by Protestants but are included in the canon of several other church traditions. In the first story,
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Bel (Deity)
BEL (DEITY) [Heb bēl (בֵּל)]. Essentially a title: “lord” or “master”. Akk bēlu, “lord,” when applied to the gods, was fairly synonymous with the Hebrew. The Akkadian term might also be a theophoric element in divine names, or even a DN itself; it may have reference to the potencies and functions of
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Bel
Bel. Title of the state god of Babylon, Marduk, mentioned disdainfully by both Isaiah (46:1) and Jeremiah (Jer 50:2; 51:44).See Babylon, Babylonia; Marduk.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Bel
Bel bel [Heb. bēl]. Name of a Babylonian god, the counterpart of the Canaanite Baal, identified in the OT and Apocrypha with Marduk or Merodach, the tutelary deity of Babylon (cf. Isa. 46:1; Jer. 50:2; 51:44; Bar. 6 [Letter of Jeremiah]:41). See the discussion of Marduk in Religions of the Biblical
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon NEB DANIEL, BEL, AND THE SNAKE. A book of the OT Apocrypha, an addition to the book of Daniel along with Song of the Three Young Men and Susanna.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Bel
BEL Title of the state god of Babylon, Marduk, mentioned disdainfully by Isaiah (Is 46:1). Jeremiah speaks of Bel (Jer 50:2; 51:44), and Bel is the idol in the apocryphal Bel and the Dragon. See Marduk.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Bel
Bel, one of the names of Marduk, the leading god of Babylon (Isa. 46:1; Jer. 50:2). In Bel and the Dragon, an addition to Daniel included in the Apocrypha/deuterocanonical literature, Bel is the name of an idol who is fed regularly and supposedly eats the food. Daniel exposes the deception, revealing
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon, one of the Additions to Daniel found at the end of that book in the lxx (and in the Theodotion version of Daniel, a second-century ce Greek translation). It may have been composed in Hebrew and added to some manuscripts of the Hebrew-Aramaic version of Daniel during the course of
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Bel
BEL. The name or title of the principal Babylonian deity, Marduk (*Merodach), whose overthrow was synonymous with the end of Babylon and its domination (Je. 50:2; 51:44). In this connection Bel is named with the god Nabû (*NEBO), who was considered his son (Is. 46:1). Bēl (Sumerian en, ‘lord’; Heb.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Bel
Bel (Heb. bēl; Akk. bēlu[m])An Akkadian common noun meaning “master,” “ruler,” “lord,” or “owner”; the cognate of West Semitic baʿl. In Akkadian the term was widely used to refer to the king or to specify various officials (e.g., bēl pīḫati, “governor”). Together with the proper name of any deity,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Bel
Bel [bĕl] (Heb. bēl, from Akk. belu “master, lord”). The principal Babylonian deity. Like Heb. ba˓al, the name may simply designate any god or may point to a supreme god. It was first applied as an epithet of the Sumerian Enlil, god of the atmosphere and wind (counterpart to the Canaanite Baal)
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon. †The last of the additions to Daniel, appended as ch. 14 in the LXX and Vulgate as well as in modern Roman Catholic versions and as ch. 13 in Theodotion’s translation.This addition contains two stories whose primary purpose is to demonstrate the folly of idolatry. In the first
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Bel
BEL (Hebrew bēl, which represents Akkadian belu, “lord”) The name used in the Old Testament for the Babylonian god Marduk (Isa 46:1; Jer 50:2, 51:44). Daniel exposed the fraud of the Babylonian priests and so was given permission to destroy the idol and its temple (Dan 14:3–22).
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Bel
Bel. Another form of ‘Baal’ (q.v.). In Jer. 50:2, 51:44 and Is. 46:1, he is the guardian deity of Babylon, the empire which held the Jews captive.
Bel and the Dragon
Bel and the Dragon (or Bel and the Serpent [or Snake]). Two stories attached to the Book of *Daniel in certain Gk. MSS (*Septuagint and *Theodotion) of the OT and hence included (as a single item) in the *Apocrypha of the English Bible. The former recounts (vv. 1–22; [Vulg.] Dan. 13:65–14:21) how
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Bel
Belthe Aramaic form of Baal, the national god of the Babylonians (Isa. 46:1; Jer. 50:2; 51:44). It signifies “lord.” (See BAAL.)
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