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Beelzebul
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Alternately Beelzebub, Baalzebul, Baalzebub. A designation for a god of Ekron and later a satanic entity. Although the etymology is uncertain, the meaning of Beelzebul seemingly transitions from a name of a Semitic deity to an agent of Satan, or in some cases Satan himself.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Beelzebul
Beelzebul (בַּעַל זְבוּב‎, ba'al zevuv, Βεελζεβουλ, Beelzeboul). Alternately Beelzebub, Baalzebul, Baalzebub. A designation for a god of Ekron and later a satanic entity. Although the etymology is uncertain, the meaning of Beelzebul seemingly transitions from a name of a Semitic deity to an agent of Satan,
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Beelzebul
BEELZEBUL [Gk Beelzeboul (Βεελζεβουλ); Heb baʿal zĕbûb (בַּעַל זְבוּב)]. Var. BEELZEBUB; BAALZEBUB. According to the synoptic accounts, Jesus was accused of expelling demons by the power of Beelzebul, a name for the “prince of demons” (ho archōn tōn daimoniōn), that is, SATAN (Mark 3:22–26; Matt
Baal-Zebub (Deity)
BAAL-ZEBUB (DEITY) [Heb baʿal zĕbûb (בַּעַל זְבוּב)]. A god of Ekron, whom King Ahaziah wished to consult to learn if he would recover from a sickness he was experiencing as a result of a fall (2 Kgs 1:2, 3, 6, 16). However, Elijah pronounced Yahweh’s judgment of death on the king for failing to inquire
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Baal-zebub
Baal-zebub. Pagan god of the Philistine city of Ekron. After King Ahaziah of Israel fell from his upstairs porch (852 bc), he sent messengers to Baal-zebub to ask about his recovery (2 Kgs 1:2). He was severely rebuked for that by the prophet Elijah, who declared that his affront to Israel’s God would
Be-elzebul, Beelzebub
Be-elzebul, Beelzebub. Epithet meaning “lord of the flies” or “lord of the manure pile,” referring to Satan. It was used against Jesus by his enemies (Mt 10:25, kjv Beelzebub; 12:24; Lk 11:15).See Baal-zebub.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Beelzebul
Beelzebul bē-elʹzə-bul [GK. Beezeboul var Beelzeboul—‘master of the (heavenly) dwelling’; Latin and Syriac versions have Beelzebub—‘master of the flies’] (Mk. 3:22 par Mt. 12:24 and Lk. 11:15; Mt. 12:27 par Lk. 11:18f; Mt. 10:25); AV, NEB, BEELZEBUB (following Vulg.). A relatively obscure name for
Baal-Zebub
Baal-Zebub bāl-zēbʹub [Heb. ba‘al zeḇûḇ—‘lord of flies’; Gk. Baal-myian]. A god worshiped in the Philistine city of Ekron and consulted by Ahaziah king of Israel regarding his recovery from a sickness (2 K. 1:2f, 6, 16).Since the Heb. zeḇûḇ means “fly” (as LXX GK. myían; cf. Josephus Ant.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Beelzebul
BEELZEBUL* Epithet meaning “lord of the flies” or “lord of the manure pile,” referring to Satan. It was used against Jesus by his enemies (Mt 10:25, kjv “Beelzebub”; 12:24; Lk 11:15). See Baal-zebub.
Baal-Zebub
BAAL-ZEBUB Pagan god of the Philistine city of Ekron. After King Ahaziah of Israel fell from his upstairs porch (852 bc), he sent messengers to Baal-zebub to ask about his recovery (2 Kgs 1:2). He was severely rebuked for that by the prophet Elijah, who declared that his affront to Israel’s God would
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Baal-Zebub
Baal-zebub (bay´uhl-zee´buhb, bah´uhl-zee´ buhb; also Beelzebub [bee-el´zi-buhb]; Heb., “baal [lord] of flies”), a god worshiped by the Philistines at Ekron (2 Kings 1:2–16). The actual name may have been Baal-zebul, meaning “lord of the lofty abode,” but Israelites who considered this god an unworthy
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Beelzebub
BEELZEBUB. This name designates Satan as the “chief of the devils” (Lk 11:18). The perverted Pharisees accused Jesus of exorcising demons (Lk 11:15, 19), of having (Mk 3:22), or even being, this fallen prince (Mt 10:25; 12:24). Beelzebub (from 2 Kgs 1:2) is the Syriac and Latin Vulgate (hence KJV) rendering
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Baal-Zebub, Beelzebul
BAAL-ZEBUB, BEELZEBUL. 1. In OT Heb. ba‘al zebûḇ (‘lord of flies’), probably a mocking alteration of ba‘al zeḇûl (‘Prince *Baal’), appears as the name of the god of Ekron, whom Ahaziah, king of Israel, tried to consult in his last illness (2 Ki. 1:1–6, 16).2. In NT Gk. beelzeboul, beezeboul (Beelzebub
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Beelzebul
Beelzebul (Gk. Beelzeboúl)The Greek rendering of Baal-zebul, corrupted into Baal-zebub in the OT. In the Synoptic Gospels Jesus is accused of performing exorcisms by the power of Beelzebul, “the ruler of the demons” (Matt. 12:24 = Mark 3:22 = Luke 11:15), and in Matt. 10:25 Jesus’ opponents identify
Baal-Zebub
Baal-Zebub (Heb. baʿal zĕḇûḇ)God of the Philistine city Ekron. The Israelite king Ahaziah consulted Baal-zebub about recovering from a fall, whereupon Elijah announced Ahaziah’s death (2 Kgs. 1:2, 3, 6, 16).The name suggests a Semitic deity adopted after the Philistines settled in Canaan, although
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Beelzebul
Beelzebul [bē ĕlˊzĭ bŭl] (Gk. Beelzeboul, Beezeboul “master of the heavenly dwelling”). A name which the scribes derisively applied to Jesus upon his healing of a demon-possessed person (Matt. 12:24 par. Mark 3:22; Luke 11:15; KJV, NIV “Beelzebub”). Although Beelzebul (on the basis of Gk.
Baal-Zebub
Baal-Zebub [bāl zēˊbŭb] (Heb. ba˓al zeḇûḇ “lord of flies”). An idol worshipped at Ekron (2 Kgs. 1:2–18) also named Beel-zebul, to which Ahaziah the king of Israel (ca. 845 B.C.) sent messengers requesting Baal-zebub to cure him. In Phoenicia Baal was also a sun-god, and possibly also a god
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Baal Zebub
BAAL ZEBUB בעל זבובI. The name Baal Zebub occurs only four times in the OT (2 Kgs 1:2, 3, 6, 16). In 2 Kgs 1 an accident of Ahaziah, the king of Israel, and his consulting the oracle of the god Baal Zebub of Ekron is described. For etymological reasons, Baal Zebub must be considered a Semitic god; he
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Beelzebul
BEELZEBUL (Greek spelling of Baal-zebul; see Beelzebub) A term used by the Pharisees for the “prince of demons,” the devil. Jesus was accused by the Pharisees of expelling demons by the power of Beelzebul (Matt 10:25, 12:24–27; Mark 3:22–26; Luke 11:15–19). Jesus prefers to call him “Satan” or “the devil.”
Beelzebub
BEELZEBUB (Hebrew, “lord of flies,” a disparaging pun on “Baal-zebul,” meaning “Prince Baal”) A deity worshipped by the Philistines at Ekron. Ahaziah, king of Israel, sent messengers to consult this god for him when he was wounded (2 Kgs 1:2). In the New Testament the Greek spelling Beelzebul is used