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Beast
Beasts • Four Beasts of Daniel
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Beast
Beast. Animal in both the OT and NT, having in some cases a figurative significance. The word has a variety of meanings in the OT. Some of the diversity is due to inconsistent translations of several Hebrew words which can signify “living creature” as well as “beast,” but which have sometimes been translated
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Beast
Beast [Heb. behēmâ, ḥayyâ nep̱eš (Lev. 24:18), be‘îr (Gen. 45:17; Ex. 22:5), neḇēlâ (Lev. 7:24), ḥay (Gen. 8:1), benê šāḥaṣ (“proud beasts,” Job 28:8), part of mûṯ (“dead beast,” Ex. 21:34f), genēḇâ (“stolen beast,” Ex. 22:4), merî’ (“fed beast,” Isa. 1:11), ṭeḇaḥ
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Beast
BEAST Animal in both the OT and NT, having in some cases a figurative significance. The word has a variety of meanings in the OT. Some of the diversity is due to inconsistent translations of several Hebrew words that can signify “living creature” as well as “beast,” but which have sometimes been translated
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Beasts
beasts, a general term for animals (Gen. 1:24) or, more often, dangerous animals (Rev. 6:8). It is also employed pejoratively for human beings (Titus 1:12). In apocalyptic literature, fantastic beasts are often described in mythical language. Dan. 7 uses four such beasts to symbolize four kingdoms, and
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Beast (Symbolic)
BEAST (SYMBOLIC). This expression is frequently used in Scripture in a figurative or symbolic sense. It may symbolize especially tyrannical monarchies. The four beasts in Dan 7:3, 17, 23 represent four kingdoms (Babylon, Medo-Persia, Greece, Rome). The fourth beast (Dan 7:7–8, 19–26) is said to have
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Beast
BEAST. Although found widely in most modern evv, including rsv, the word ‘beast’ is now largely obsolete as a precise term. Coming from Old French, it was in general use when the Bible was first translated into English: ‘animal’, which has now replaced it, is from Latin and first appeared early 16th
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Beast
BeastUnspecified creatures from the animal kingdom. Heb. ḥayyâ (cf. Aram. ḥêwâ) and bĕhēmâ most often refer to mammals and are often used as collective terms for an assortment of animals. Heb. ḥayyâ frequently refers to wild animals, while bĕhēmâ is more commonly applied to domesticated
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Beast
Beast. A term used to distinguish any animal from human beings (Heb. behēmâ, e.g., Gen. 6:7; Eccl. 3:18–21). The Old Testament distinguishes between clean and unclean animals (Lev. 11:1–8); the Israelites were permitted to eat only the former. Furthermore, the Israelites divided the animals into
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Beast
BeastThis word is used of flocks or herds of grazing animals (Ex. 22:5; Num. 20:4, 8, 11; Ps. 78:48); of beasts of burden (Gen. 45:17); of eatable beasts (Prov. 9:2); and of swift beasts or dromedaries (Isa. 60:6). In the New Testament it is used of a domestic animal as property (Rev. 18:13); as used
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Beasts
Beastsbeasts, large, often dangerous animals. In the Bible the word has several uses. 1 As a general term for animals (Gen. 1:24). 2 As a term for wild, dangerous animals (Rev. 6:8). 3 As a pejorative term for human beings (Titus 1:12). 4 As a term for mythical beings or allegorical symbols. In Daniel
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Beast
BEAST — literally, an animal; figuratively, a symbol, often prophetic. The word “beast” is used literally in three ways in the Bible: (1) any animal, both Clean and Unclean (Gen. 6:7; 7:2; Lev. 11:1–8); (2) a wild animal, as distinguished from domesticated animals (Gen. 1:24; 7:21; 37:20; Ex. 23:11);