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Bath Kol
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The “daughter of the voice,” “sound,” or “divine voice.”Originally this phrase could refer to any sound, but rabbis (especially in the period of the Tannaim, circa 100 bc–200 ad) used it to signify God’s voice when unaccompanied by a visible manifestation. They considered this to be different from the way God spoke to Moses (which included visible phenomena) and the prophets (which, it was claimed, did not include an audible voice).The conception appears for the first time in Dan 4:31: “A voice fell from heaven.” Josephus (Antiquities, 13.10.3) relates that John Hyrcanus (135–104 bc) heard a voice while offering a burnt sacrifice in the temple, which Josephus expressly interprets as the voice of God.In the New Testament, the following passages mention “a voice from heaven”: Matt 3:17; Matt 17:5; Mark 1:11; Mark 9:7; Luke 3:22; Luke 9:35; John 12:28; Acts 9:4; 22:7; 10:13–15.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Bath Kol
Bath Kol (בַּת קוֹל‎, bath qol). The “daughter of the voice,” “sound,” or “divine voice.”Originally this phrase could refer to any sound, but rabbis (especially in the period of the Tannaim, circa 100 bc–200 ad) used it to signify God’s voice when unaccompanied by a visible manifestation. They considered
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Bath Kol
Bath Kol bath kōl [Heb. baṯ qôl—‘daughter of the voice,’ i.e., ‘sound’]. A rabbinic term signifying the divine voice, audible to man and unaccompanied by a visible divine manifestation. Thus conceived, baṯ qôl is to be distinguished from God’s speaking to Moses and the prophets; for at Sinai the
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
BATH KOL
BATH KOL<bath’-kol>, <bath kol> (בַּת קוֹל‎ [bath qol], “the daughter of the voice”): Originally signifying no more than “sound,” “tone,” “call” (e.g. water in pouring gives forth a “sound,” [bath qol], while oil does not), sometimes also “echo.” The expression acquired among the rabbis a
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Bath Kol
Bath Kol bath-kohl′ (בַּת קוֹל‎, lit., “the daughter of a voice,” i.e., “a sound”). Also Bath Qol. This rabbinic term denotes an audible divine voice apart from any visible divine manifestation. It is distinguishable from such phenomena as God’s speaking to Moses, where there was a divine manifestation
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Bath Kol
BATH KOL, bathʹkol, bath kōl (בַּת קוֹל‎, bath ḳōl, “the daughter of the voice”): Originally signifying no more than “sound,” “tone,” “call” (e.g. water in pouring gives forth a “sound,” bath ḳōl, while oil does not), sometimes also “echo.” The expression acquired among the rabbis a special use,