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The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Basket
Basket [Heb. dûḏ, ṭene’, sal, kelûḇ, tēḇâ; Gk. kóphinos, spyrís, sargánē]; AV also ARK (Ex. 2:3, 5), “pots” (Ps. 81:6).
Basin
Basin [Heb. mizrāq, sap̱, ’aggān, ag̱arṭāl; Gk. niptḗr, kratḗr, trýblion, phiála, psyktḗr, lébēs, etc.]; AV also BASON, BOWL, CHARGER (Ezr. 1:9); NEB also TOSSING-BOWL, BLANKET (2 S. 17:8).The Heb. mizrāq (< zāraq, “toss, sprinkle”) is a bowl used especially in connection with the
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Basin
basin. Several Hebrew words mean “basin,” “bowl,” “laver,” or the like. One such word (mizraq) describes a utensil used in both cultic (Exod. 27:3; Num. 7) and noncultic settings (Amos 6:6; Zech. 9:15). Another common word (kiyyor) also identifies a vessel used in both cultic (Exod. 30:18) and secular
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Basket
BASKET. Woven or plaited of reeds or straw, baskets had many uses; exact size and shape is not always clear. One type, often carried on the head, was used for both secular and sacrificial purposes (Gen 40:16–18; Ex 29:3, 23, 32; Lev 8:2, 26, 31; Num 6:15, 17, 19; Jdg 6:19). A rough wicker basket was
Basin, Bason
BASIN, BASON Several words are translated “basin” (or “bason”) in KJV. Basins were usually metal.1. The Heb. word ˓aggān, a large banqueting bowl or crater; used also for catching and sprinkling blood in sacrifice (Ex 24:6). A smaller size may also have existed (“cups,” Isa 22:24).2. Heb. kpôr (“bowl,”
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Basket
BASKET. The following Heb. words are translated ‘basket’. 1. dûḏ, a round basket large enough to hold a human head (2 Ki. 10:7), but normally used for carrying figs, etc. (Ps. 81:6; Je. 24:1–2). 2. ṭene’ (loan-word from Egyp. dnyt, ‘basket’), used for storing produce (Dt. 26:2, 4) parallel to kneading-trough
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Basket
BasketIn biblical cultures, people used baskets for carrying burdens and storing materials. Baskets existed in various sizes, some with handles or lids. Biblical texts use various Hebrew words to refer to baskets. The sal carried food (Gen. 40:16; Judg. 6:19; Exod. 29:3). The ṭeneʾ held food offerings
Basin
BasinA shallow open vessel, represented by various Hebrew words. Heb. ʾăg̱arṭāl is probably a basket (Ezra 1:9), while ʾaggān indicates a bowl (Exod. 24:6). Heb. mizrāq (< zāraq, “sprinkle”) is a deep bowl into which was poured the blood of the slaughtered animals to be sprinkled on the sides
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Basket
Basket. In the Old Testament several Hebrew words are rendered “basket.” Heb. dûḏ may refer to the basket in which the Israelites carried fruit (Jer. 24:1–2) or clay for making bricks in Egypt (Ps. 81:6). Heb. ṭene˒ is a large, deep basket used for carrying the first of the fruit (Deut. 26:2,
Basin
Basin The Hebrews used several words to designate an open vessel. Heb. *˒ag̱arṭāl is probably a basket (so KoB, p. 9; RSV “basin,” Ezra 1:9; KJV “charger”; NIV “dish”; JB “bowl”), while Heb. ˒aggān is a bowl (so NIV, Exod. 24:6). Heb. mizrāq (< Heb. zāraq “sprinkle”) is a
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Basket
BASKET A container made of woven reeds, fiber, or cane. Baskets were very common in biblical times and were made in a variety of sizes depending upon their function, such as storing bread, grapes, fruit, and other items. They could also be large enough to accommodate a man; Paul escaped from Damascus
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Basket
Basket. The Hebrew terms used in the description of this article are as follows: (1) Sal, so called from the twigs of which it was originally made, specially used for holding bread. Gen. 40:16ff.; Ex. 29:3, 23; Lev. 8:2, 26, 31; Num. 6:15, 17, 19. (2) Salsillôth, a word of kindred origin, applied to
Basin
Basin. Among the smaller vessels for the tabernacle or temple service, many must have been required to receive from the sacrificial victims the blood to be sprinkled for purification. The “basin” from which our Lord washed the disciples’ feet was probably deeper and larger than the hand-basin for sprinkling.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Basket
BASKET. No fewer than five common Heb. words are used to denote baskets or containers of different sizes, shapes, and construction. Ancient art reliefs and sculptures and the etymological meaning of the words used show that the baskets were frequently woven or made of fiber from leaves of the palm tree
Basin
BASIN. This word is used for dishes, containers, and bowls of various descriptions. (1) A large bowl, Heb. mizrāq, was a part of the furnishing of the Tabernacle and the Temple, particularly in service at the altar of burnt offering (Num. 4:14) to hold the grain offering (7:13) and to receive sacrificial
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Basket
BasketThere are five different Hebrew words so rendered in the Authorized Version: (1.) A basket (Heb. sal, a twig or osier) for holding bread (Gen. 40:16; Ex. 29:3, 23; Lev. 8:2, 26, 31; Num. 6:15, 17, 19). Sometimes baskets were made of twigs peeled; their manufacture was a recognized trade among
Basin
Basinor Bason. (1.) A trough or laver (Heb. aggan’) for washing (Ex. 24:6); rendered also “goblet” (Cant. 7:2) and “cups” (Isa. 22:24).(2.) A covered dish or urn (Heb. kfor) among the vessels of the temple (1 Chr. 28:17; Ezra 1:10; 8:27).(3.) A vase (Heb. mizrak) from which to sprinkle anything. A
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Basin
Basinbasin, a shallow receptacle for liquids. In the ot there are several Hebrew words that mean ‘basin,’ ‘bowl,’ ‘laver,’ or the like. One such word (mizrak) describes a utensil used in both cultic (Exod. 27:2; Num. 7) and noncultic settings (Amos 6:6; Zech. 9:15). Another common word (kiyyor) also
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Basket
BASKET — a container made of woven cane or other fibers. The Bible provides sparse information about the size and shape of baskets. They were fashioned out of various materials: willow, rush, palm-leaf twigs, and even a mixture of straw and clay. Some had handles and lids. These baskets served various
Basin
BASIN — a round, shallow container, such as a cup or bowl, used primarily for holding liquids. Basins were used for washing (John 13:5), for holding wine and other liquids (Ex. 24:6), and for receiving the blood of sacrifices (Zech. 9:15). Usually basins were fashioned out of bronze or clay, although