Loading…
Barki Nafshi
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Five collections of fragments found at Qumran Cave 4 (4Q434–438) that seem to comprise a nonbiblical, sectarian work named from its opening line: “Bless, O my soul, the Lord!” (ברכי נפשי את אדוני‎, brky npshy 't 'dwny). The author was likely inspired by Psa 103 and Psa 104, which open with a very similar line (Psa 103:1; 104:1). The Barkhi Nafshi collection of Hebrew-language psalms give thanksgiving for deliverance and the mercy of God.Barkhi Nafshi seems to be modeled after the genre of the biblical psalms, which fits with other literature from the Dead Sea Scrolls (ca. 250 bcad 50). There are also other prayerful, poetic compositions found among the Qumran writings, such as Festival Prayers and noncanonical and apocryphal psalms (Schuller, “Petitionary Prayer,” 30). However, Barkhi Nafshi is less liturgical than the Festival Prayers. Barkhi Nafshi especially resembles in poetic style the Thanksgiving Scroll, although Barkhi Nafshi is less personal.The sensory language of the Barkhi Nafshi collection of hymns may exemplify an emphasis throughout the Qumran literature of the “divinely imparted ability to receive revelation” (Gladd, Revealing the Mysterion, 81; 4Q436 frag 1 1.5–6).Of particular note in the Barkhi Nafshi is the unique contribution to Second Temple thought in the phrase “spirit of holiness” (Psa 51:11), which is applied to spiritual transformation of God’s people, both presently and eschatologically (4Q436 frag. 1 1.10–2.1; 4Q435 frag. 1 1.2; see also Deut 30:6; Jubilees 1:23; Smith, “Spirit of Holiness,” 97).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Barkhi Nafshi
Barkhi Nafshi (ברכי נפשי‎, brky npshy). Five collections of fragments found at Qumran Cave 4 (4Q434–438) that seem to comprise a nonbiblical, sectarian work named from its opening line: “Bless, O my soul, the Lord!” (ברכי נפשי את אדוני‎, brky npshy 't 'dwny). The author was likely inspired by Psa 103 and
Dictionary of New Testament Background
Barki Nafshi
BARKI NAFSHI (4Q434, 436, 437–439)This group of texts gets its name from the phrase barkı̂ naps̆ı̂ ʾet ʾadȏnay (“Bless the Lord, O my soul”), also known from Psalms 103 and 104. Whether the preponderance of these fragments are all copies of one text or fragments of the same copy is hard to establish.